Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

According to a new poll from Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research, Michele Bachmann is in danger of being booted from Congress in November — and her wacky 2012 presidential campaign may be to blame.

The poll shows Bachmann leading her Democratic challenger, Richard Graves, by a narrow 48 to 43 percent margin. 9 percent are undecided.

This is a major warning sign for the Tea Party favorite, given Bachmann’s incumbent status and 96 percent name recognition. According to the GQR survey, 56 percent of voters rate Bachmann’s job performance as “just fair” or “poor” compared to 39 percent who rate it as “good” or “excellent.” Similarly, 51 percent have an unfavorable opinion of Bachmann, compared to just 35 percent who view her favorably.

Another concern for Bachmann is the fact that voters become far more likely to support Graves once they are introduced to his life story; after reading brief positive profiles of both candidates, Graves claims a 52 to 43 percent lead over Bachmann.

“Congresswoman Michele Bachmann’s unsuccessful bid for president had a clear an negative impact on her standing among voters,” the Democratic polling and consulting firm concludes in a press release.

Although liberals would love to see the right wing icon deposed, The Fix’s Rachel Weiner warns that Bachmann won’t go down easily. After all, she crushed her 2010 opponent by over 10 points after becoming the focus of a national Democratic effort to defeat her, and her new district is actually slightly more Republican than the one that she had before redistricting this year.

Overall, signs point to a close race that is certain to attract plenty of media attention as Election Day nears.

Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

Keep reading... Show less