The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

If you thought the anger of Occupy Wall Street protesters at the influence of money on politics, or maybe that Wall Street bankers are so unhappy with the president, might mean Democrats would face a brutal fundraising environment this go around, a House GOP aide has news: Dems are “crushing it”:

President Barack Obama’s approval ratings are in the dumps, and so is the economy. Wall Street’s cash cows are angry at the Democratic Party and its sudden embrace of populist rhetoric. Almost no one thinks Democrats have a shot at winning back the House next year and Republicans have an excellent chance of winning control of the Senate.

Yet even with the prospect of an entirely GOP-controlled federal government in 2013, Democrats are outraising their GOP counterparts in month after month.

In September alone, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee nearly doubled the National Republican Congressional Committee’s take, while the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee raised $1 million more than the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

The piece goes on to cite, among other things, Democrats’ openness to bringing in lobbyist money from interest groups, Nancy Pelosi’s continued draw as a high-dollar fundraiser, and the proliferation of outside spending groups as key factors, but one has to wonder if much of this isn’t simply a result of Democrats being reasonably happy with a somewhat activist president who has accomplished a good deal of what he promised. On Iraq, healthcare, and Wall Street reform, the White House can point to real progress.

And so even if much of the left is channeling its energies into the Occupy Wall Street protests, frustrated with the relatively meager gains of the Dodd-Frank financial reform law and the ongoing foreclosure and economic crises, many rank-and-file Democrats are giving generously to their party, egged on by the loopy nature of the Republicans challenging the president.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

The Treasury Department's nine-page "2021 Sanctions Review" released on Monday makes vague recommendations for "calibrating sanctions to mitigate unintended economic, political, and humanitarian impact." Unfortunately, it offers few tangible policy suggestions on how to end the high humanitarian
Keep reading... Show less

Mt.Rushmore

Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}