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By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., EatingWell.com

Q: Do artificial sweeteners make you hungrier? — E. Berliet, Lyon, France

A: I’d hope not, since lots of people use artificial sweeteners to control calories. But the research on the topic isn’t so straightforward. In fact, the effect of these sweeteners on your appetite may depend on the form in which you’re consuming them.

A 2009 review concluded that artificial sweeteners in items with few, if any, calories such as diet soda, may heighten appetite.

Yet the same review (published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition) also reported that artificial sweeteners eaten in combination with or in foods containing calories don’t increase appetite.

Similarly, a new study in the journal Appetite showed that eating an artificially sweetened appetizer–vs. one that’s sugar-sweetened–before a meal didn’t stoke participants’ appetites.

Since the 2009 review, two studies have come out on the effect on appetite of noncaloric, artificially sweetened beverages. The findings are conflicting — one study found that they increased levels of a feel-full hormone, while the other study showed no change.

There’s a lot of uncertainty, but if you want something sweet, choosing items that are artificially sweetened can help you save calories. However, for overall health, I agree with Barry Popkin, Ph.D., distinguished professor of global nutrition at the University of North Carolina that “it’s best to limit your consumption of added sweeteners” — artificial or not.

(EatingWell is a magazine and website devoted to healthy eating as a way of life. Online at www.eatingwell.com.) (c) 2015 EATING WELL, INC. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY, LLC

Photo: frankieleon via Flickr

Melania and Donald Trump with Xi Jinping and Peng Liyuan

Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

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