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Ted Cruz may have won the Iowa caucuses, but he and his campaign have apparently now seriously poisoned their relationship with another religious-right candidate: Ben Carson, who says that Cruz’s campaign was actively telling voters that the good doctor was already dropping out of the race.

Perhaps the single worst offense: A tweet by Congressman Steve King, a Cruz supporter, announcing that Carson was out and that voters should switch to Cruz.

“Here’s the thing: If Ted Cruz doesn’t know about this, then he clearly needs to very quickly get rid of some people in his organization,” Carson said Tuesday morning on Fox News. “And if he does know about it, isn’t this the exact kind of thing that the American people are tired of? Why would we continue with that kind of shenanigans?”

Hmm, it’s easy to see why Cruz (and King) are both so hated on Capitol Hill. But the real question is, could this kind of political tire-slashing affect Carson and his supporters’ preferences going forward?

Here are 5 dirty tricks Ted Cruz has used to fool voters.

Video via Fox & Friends/Fox News.

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Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

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