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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By now you may well feel that you’ve seen enough of last week’s epic Senate hearings on the Brett Kavanaugh nomination — the testimony of his accuser Christine Blasey Ford, the histrionics of the Supreme Court nominee himself, and the performances of their interlocutors.

We felt the same exhaustion. But that was before we watched John Oliver unpack this sorry story on Last Week Tonight.

Contrasting Ford’s dignified appearance with Kavanaugh’s blubber and bluster, Oliver observes that “men might be too emotional for the Supreme Court,” an honor to which the surly judge clearly feels entitled. Did she lie? Did he? Well, she’s “a terrified psychology professor who blew up her entire life to relive her trauma on a national stage,” while he’s “Judge Animal House, who seemed to be sweatily making up drinking games before members of the Senate.”

So we reached a new low in partisan perversion of the judicial nominating process, which only seems to thrill the Republicans. “It feels like they’re doing this to deliver a f**k you to Democrats and even more directly a f**k you to women.”

Yes, Oliver puts his own twist on this mess — and you don’t want to miss it.

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