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The first signs that the Bitcoin bubble will implode have appeared on the financial horizon, with sudden deep drops and spikes in value that do not augur well. Catastrophic losses, when they occur, should be no surprise — because the crypto-currency is essentially a scam that attracts right-wing rubes into handing over real dollars for something with zero intrinsic value.

Of course, the far right financial geniuses who have made fast profits by touting Bitcoin never tell the suckers that they’re buying nothing but a number cooked up by an algorithm — or that there is an infinite supply of that numerical commodity.

But Late Night with Seth Meyers offers this “commercial” that depicts what happened to a housewife who entrusted her kids’ college fund to the latest digital investment. Very funny, except that if it hasn’t already happened to some sad boob, it will soon.

 

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Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

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