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How can President Trump’s vitriol toward the world be expressed in one image? Leave it to an unlikely source – Nicole Wallace, NBC News titan turned troll-extraordinaire.

Or at least that’s what Twitter is calling her after a memorable gambit on MSNBC’s Deadline: White House. Faced with the unfathomable task of describing Trump’s years of aggressive rage and personal attacks in only one segment, Wallace builds a wall.

At least 400 names and organizations litter the mural of a President’s hatred, including all of the people 45 has insulted since announcing his candidacy in 2015. Musicians like Jay Z and Neil Young. Members of Trump’s own campaign team like Chris Christie. Pundits such as, well, Nicole Wallace.

Stormy Daniels is oddly missing from the wall of Trump targets, showing once again that the only way to Donald’s heart is through the backside. Click to see the POTUS take a whole different kind of spanking.

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A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

The Treasury Department's nine-page "2021 Sanctions Review" released on Monday makes vague recommendations for "calibrating sanctions to mitigate unintended economic, political, and humanitarian impact." Unfortunately, it offers few tangible policy suggestions on how to end the high humanitarian
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Mt.Rushmore

Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

When iconoclasts topple Jefferson, they seem to validate the argument advanced by defenders of Confederate monuments that there is no escape from the slippery slope. "First, they come for Nathan Bedford Forrest and then for Robert E. Lee. Where does it end? Is Jefferson next? Is George Washington?"

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