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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Donald Trump rallies are no strangers to controversy, and yesterday’s appearance in Bangor, Maine with Governor Paul LePage promised to have a healthy dose of cringe-worthy remarks for internet columnists to enthusiastically snarl about. Cue Howie Carr, the conservative Boston talk-radio host, who introduced LePage and referred to Elizabeth Warren by placing his hand on his mouth in a stereotypical Native American “war whoop.”

As Carr later wrote in his Boston Herald column, “I was speaking extemporaneously when I free-associated Fauxchohantas’ name, and suddenly a war whoop seemed appropriate for the occasion.” Trump, he says, advised him not to apologize.

The presumptive Republican nominee and several of his surrogates have attacked Warren over formerly listing herself as a minority on the Association of American Law Schools directory when she was a professor and for being promoted as a Native American at Harvard Law School. A genealogist indicated that she might be 1/32 Native American, but the Washington Post “Fact Checker” blog found that the evidence was essentially inconclusive. Trump surrogate and erstwhile Warren Senate opponent Scott Brown called for a DNA test Monday, but even with current technology, it would be highly difficult (if not impossible) to trace Warren’s Native American ancestry using this method.

The controversy over Native American heritage actually began in the 2012 Warren-Brown race. Brown staffers were also filmed doing “war whoops” at the time. During the race, Warren stated that she had never received advantage from referring to herself as Native American.

Elizabeth Warren has recently come out swinging for Hillary Clinton, and she has been attacking Trump in speeches, interviews, and Twitter posts for months. Today, she tweeted about a new J.K. Rowling story that takes place in a wizarding school in Massachusetts:

Photo: YouTube/Victoria Applegate

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.