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Having given up on creating jobs, Wisconsin’s Republicans are focused on attacking women’s ability to make their own medical choices. “Small government”-loving Scott Walker will become the new “Governor Ultrasound” when he signs a bill mandating that all women face an invasive medical procedure before they are allowed to have an abortion.

To get a sense of the anti-abortion fervor in Wisconsin, watch the video above. Former Real World star Rachel Campos-Duffy, who is married to former Real World star Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI), recently called anti-abortion activists “warriors,” adding that “they’re human rights activists on the scale of William Wilberforce, who fought for the abolition of the slave trade.”

She also had a warning for the 80 percent of Americans who believe abortion should be legal at least in some circumstances.

“And those who kept silent during this time I think will find themselves on the wrong side of history,” Campos-Duffy said. “We often look back at things like the Holocaust and slavery and go, ‘How can they think that way?'”

This rhetoric of comparing abortion to slavery is common on the “pro-life” far right. Paul Ryan (R-WI) has done it. Ken Cuccinelli (R-VA) loves it.

Yet the far right often fights against the availability of the measures most likely to prevent abortion, including sex education and mandatory birth control coverage.

And those who believe that opposing abortion is like opposing slavery rarely note that abortion rates are higher in countries where it is illegal.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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