The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Hagatna (Guam) (AFP) — A Guam man was found guilty Monday of killing three Japanese tourists and injuring 11 more during a frenzied knife attack in the Pacific island nation last year.

Chad Ryan De Soto had pleaded not guilty to three counts of murder and 11 of attempted murder by reason of insanity, but a jury convicted him after a seven-week trial that included two weeks of deliberations.

De Soto, 22, faces the prospect of life without parole when he is sentenced on September 25.

He has never provided an explanation for the night attack on February 12, 2013, when he plowed his car into people in the tourist district of Tumon, then leapt from the vehicle and attacked bystanders at random with a knife in each hand.

All of the victims were Japanese, including an eight-month-old baby and three-year-old toddler who both survived.

De Soto showed no emotion when judge Anita Sukola read out the jury verdict, although his mother Rae De Soto and girlfriend Reanne Acasio were both in tears.

More than 100 witnesses testified during the trial. Victims of the attack are expected to address the court at his sentencing hearing.

AFP Photo

Interested in world news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Michigan militia members at state capitol

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although Twitter and Facebook have been cracking down on some far-right users, extremists have found other ways to communicate — including the smartphone app Zello, which according to the Guardian, was useful to some far-right militia members during the siege of the U.S. Capitol Building last week.

"Zello has avoided proactive content moderation thus far," Guardian reporters Micah Loewinger and Hampton Stall explain. "Most coverage about Zello, which claims to have 150 million users on its free and premium platforms, has focused on its use by the Cajun Navy groups that send boats to save flood victims and grassroots organizing in Venezuela. However, the app is also home to hundreds of far-right channels, which appear to violate its policy prohibiting groups that espouse 'violent ideologies.'"

Keep reading... Show less