The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times

MEXICO CITY — A battle between the Mexican army and suspected drug traffickers about 120 miles south of the capital left 22 people dead and others wounded Monday, officials said.

The army said in a statement that 21 suspected gunmen and a woman were killed in the predawn clash. One soldier was wounded. Officials in the state of Mexico, which abuts the capital and where the clash was reported, confirmed that it took place but did not provide casualty figures.

The state where President Enrique Pena Nieto was governor until 2012 has seen a huge increase in violence. Even so, such a clash is unusual so close to the capital.

Recently, the federal government dispatched military forces to the state in hopes of curtailing killings, kidnappings, and other crime. It has been a priority of recent governments to keep the capital safe even as other parts of the country are out of control.

The clash was reported to have taken place in a small village called Ancon de los Curieles, near the border with Guerrero state.

The army said it came across a warehouse being guarded by gunmen, who opened fire on soldiers. After the shooting, the army said three women who had been kidnapped were rescued.

The state of Mexico is valuable turf for drug traffickers who need the route to transport drugs, reach the airport and serve a growing market of domestic consumers. The state has one of the highest homicide rates in the country.

Sanchez is a news assistant in the Times’ Mexico City bureau.

Photo via WikiCommons

Interested in world news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Sen. Bernie Sanders, left, and President Joe Biden during 2020 presidential debate

I look at September 2019 as a month where I missed something. We began with a trip to New York to do Seth Meyers’s and Dr. Oz’s shows. Why would we go on The Dr. Oz Show? For the same reason we had gone on Joe Rogan’s podcast in August: We could reach a vast audience that wasn’t paying attention to the standard political media. On Dr. Oz, Bernie could talk about Medicare for All and his own physical fitness. While at the time we believed Bernie was uncommonly healthy for his age, he was still 78. Questions would be raised related to his age, and we needed to begin building up the case that he was completely healthy and fit. It turned out to be a spectacular interview, ending with the two of them playing basketball on a makeshift court in the studio. Bernie appeared to be on top of the world.

Yet in retrospect, I should have seen Bernie growing more fatigued. After New York, with the school year starting, we did a series of rallies at colleges and universities in Iowa; this was the kickoff of our campus organizing program in the state. We would then fly to Colorado for a large rally in Denver before heading to Boulder to prep for the third debate, to take place in Houston on September 12. In Iowa, Bernie’s voice was a little hoarse. After the rally in Denver, he had completely blown it out. He sounded terrible.

Keep reading... Show less

Rep. James Clyburn

When I interviewed House Majority Whip James Clyburn in 2014 about his memoir Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black, the South Carolina Democrat was confident in America’s ability to find its way, no matter how extreme the political swings might appear at any given time.

“The country from its inception is like the pendulum on a clock,” the congressman told me. “It goes back and forward. It tops out to the right and starts back to the left — it tops out to the left and starts back to the right.” And remember, he said, it “spends twice as much time in the center.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}