The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

GOP candidates, conservative pundits, and congressional Republicans have blamed the shooting at a historically black church in Charleston, South Carolina last Wednesday on just about everything — including opioid abuse, Caitlyn Jenner, and anti-Christian sentiment — everything, that is, except the proliferation of guns and the persistence of racism in America.

After days of misdirection, euphemism, and evasion, Republicans are slowly coming around to the idea that the massacre was, in fact, a racially motivated act of domestic terrorism.

They’re even beginning to tentatively acknowledge, one by one, that the Confederate flag, currently flying on the lawn in front of the state Capitol, is worth reconsidering, as it is a symbol in line with the white supremacist ideologies espoused by the confessed shooter.

Hillary Clinton has had no such problems, speaking forcefully of the roles that racism, unchecked guns, and unacknowledged white privilege play in American culture, and how they contribute to violence and tragedy.

Speaking at an annual conference of mayors in San Francisco Saturday, the Democratic candidate was more upfront, saying that “race remains a deep fault line in America.”

“For a lot of well-meaning, open-minded white people,” she said, “the sight of a young black man in a hoodie still evokes a twinge of fear.” She cautioned that while media coverage of discrimination can “evoke sympathy, even empathy” from white viewers, it will rarely spur them to action, or to admit their own privilege. “We can’t hide from any of these hard truths about race and justice in America,” Clinton said. “We have to name them, and own them, and then change them.”

She also called for “common-sense gun reforms that keep weapons out of the hands of criminals and the violently unstable while respecting responsible gun owners.” She expressed her wish that the gun debate would be more “informed by evidence,” not “inflamed by ideologies.”

Photo: A note on the sidewalk memorial on Friday, June 19, 2015, includes photos of the 9 who were killed at the “Mother” Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, SC. (Curtis Compton/Atlanta Journal-Constitution/TNS)

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Dr. Mehmet Oz and Sean Hannity

Youtube Screenshot

Fox News prime-time host Sean Hannity is priming his audience to see election fraud in any defeat for Dr. Mehmet Oz, his favored candidate who currently leads the GOP primary for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania with two percent of votes outstanding. If the fast-closing hedge funder Dave McCormick takes the lead and the Oz camp claims the election has been stolen, it could set up a potentially explosive proxy war with Hannity’s colleague Laura Ingraham, whose Fox program favors McCormick and has suggested he is likely to prevail when all the votes are counted.

The GOP primary was a chaotic slugfest that split Fox’s slate of pro-GOP hosts in an unusually public way. Hannity was Oz’s most prominent supporter, reportedly securing the support of former President Donald Trump and using his program to endorse the TV personality, give him a regular platform, and target the challenge from right-wing commentator and Fox & Friends regular Kathy Barnette. Ingraham, meanwhile, used her Fox program (which airs in the hour following Hannity’s) to promote McCormick, criticize Oz, and defend Barnette.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Overturning Roe v. Wade is very unpopular, yet another poll confirms. Nearly two out of three people, or 64 percent, told the NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll that Roe should not be overturned, including 62 percent of independents. The poll also includes some good news for Democrats.

According to the poll, the prospect of the Supreme Court striking down Roe in the most extreme way is motivating Democratic voters more than Republicans: Sixty-six percent of Democrats say it makes them more likely to vote in November compared with 40 percent of Republicans. That echoes a recent NBC poll finding a larger rise in enthusiasm about voting among Democrats than Republicans.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}