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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

SEAN HANNITY (HOST): Well I'm looking at -- you're right, Kentucky they had protesters. I mean the dopey governor there wanted to take down people's license plates if they showed up to drive-up services for Easter Sunday. What a dope. Ralph Northam is announcing in Virginia -- mister 'well first we'll deliver the baby, and then we'll make sure the baby is comfortable, and then we'll let the mother decide if the baby lives or dies' -- that idiot, anyway. And then Michigan you had the protesters at the state capitol a ton of people there. Now more's happening. You had House and Senate voting to overturn the governor's lockdown order there.

And I'm telling you, people have had it. I think this is now -- the American people have hit their maximum, you know, stay at home orders. And I think they're saying, well alright, we'll wear masks, we'll use Purell, we'll wear gloves, but leave us alone.

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Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

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