The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Kihei (United States) (AFP) – Hawaii hunkered down Thursday as a rare pair of hurricanes took aim at the holiday paradise, with the first expected to make landfall within hours.

Big Island was expected to see a direct hit from Hurricane Iselle Thursday night, bringing with it strong winds, heavy rain and dangerous storm surges, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) warned.

In an unusual development, Iselle is being trailed by another, stronger hurricane dubbed Julio, with the prospect of a one-two punch placing the popular archipelago on even higher alert.

Packing maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour (140 kilometers per hour), Iselle — a Category 1 storm — was located some 350 miles (560 kilometers) east-southeast of Hilo and 560 miles east-southeast of the state capital Honolulu at 1200 GMT, the CPHC forecasters said.

“On the forecast track, the center of Iselle is expected to pass over the Big Island tonight and pass just south of the smaller islands Friday,” they added.

Tropical storm conditions were expected on Big Island Thursday afternoon, with hurricane conditions taking hold overnight. Maui and Oahu were forecast to see tropical storm conditions starting late Thursday.

The haven for sun-seekers from around the world was expected to see rainfall of up to 12 inches thanks to Iselle.

“These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods as well as rock and mud slides,” the CPHC cautioned.

Julio, which strengthened to a Category 2 storm overnight, was situated some 1,340 miles east of Hilo, according to the latest update from the National Hurricane Center.

With maximum sustained winds of nearly 100 miles per hour, the NHC forecasters warned it could strengthen some more before slowly losing steam.

On its current trajectory, Julio was expected to pass to the north of Big Island as a tropical storm late Saturday or Sunday.

With the twin storms fast approaching, television images showed long lines at local supermarkets, as residents and vacationers alike rushed to stock up on water and other basics to see them through the next few days.

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported that shelters would open Thursday night for residents of Oahu — home to Honolulu — and that state authorities were shutting down a slew of recreation areas that could become danger zones due to possible flash flooding and other storm-related hazards.

AFP Photo

Interested in national news? Sign up for our daily email newsletter!

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

The privilege of beholding the corals of Belize, the second largest reef system on earth, is a complete marvel that can never be taken for granted. The school of nine squid in perfect alignment that stared at us like transparent sentinels ,the green barracuda that floated as if in suspended animation, looking for prey. Those moments of utter awe were soul transformative not only for a child, but also for parents nurturing a young human to the ultimate reason to exist on this earth, to care for life.

Over the next few years, a battle was waged between environmentalists and those who saw dollars in the form of oil extraction in the reef. Thankfully on December 1, 2015, right after the Cop21 Paris Climate Accord, Belize made the tremendous decision to ban drilling outright -- and is working hard to restore coral. The same cannot be said for many other fragile parts of the world particularly the warming Arctic, where Russia has a near stranglehold of more than half the Arctic Ocean.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

The saturation of the ranks of our police forces with far-right extremists is one of the harsh realities of American life that bubbled up during the police brutality protests of 2020 and was laid bare by the January 6 insurrection. The presence of these extremists not only is a serious security and enforcement threat—particularly when it comes to dealing with far-right violence—but has created a toxic breach between our communities and the people they hire to protect and serve them. Too often, as in Portland, the resulting police culture has bred a hostility to their communities that expresses itself in biased enforcement and a stubborn unaccountability.

Much of this originates in police training, which are the foundations of cop culture. And a recent Reuters investigative report has found that police training in America is riddled with extremists: Their survey of police training firms—35 in all—that provide training to American police authorities found five of them employ (and in some cases, are operated by) men whose politics are unmistakably of the far-right extremist variety. And these five people alone are responsible for training hundreds of American cops every year.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}