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The news continues to prove that no one is safe from cyber attacks, and Congress’ recent decision to allow ISPs to sell browsing data without customer consent only adds to privacy fears. If Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump aren’t immune, how can your home network be safe?

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Connect CUJO to your home WiFi network, and you’ll protect even more than is possible with a VPN. CUJO acts like a bloodhound, sniffing out smart devices all over your house, assessing their vulnerabilities and patching any holes in their security to keep your network free of hackers and malware.

With a VPN, protection is limited to just computers and smartphones. CUJO goes far beyond that. Whether it’s a laptop, smartphone, TV, baby monitor or even smart light or thermostat, CUJO uses machine learning to track how the device usually operates, and protect every corner of your data.

CUJO is your cyber-watchdog, guarding your entire home from virtual threats before crooks or snoops can get a fingerhold in your network. With this offer lasts, you can pick up a CUJO to protect your home for almost 10% off.

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Barr And Rosenstein Must Answer In Subpoena Scandal

Photo by The United States Department of Justice (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

When Donald Trump wanted to talk about the investigation being conducted into how his campaign colluded with Russian agents, he used a term that was meant to demean and delegitimize. He called it "spying." Trump also accused the Obama administration of "wiretapping" his offices, which—no matter what Trump says—was in no sense true. But as more information emerges about the efforts of the DOJ to chase down supposed intelligence leaks, it's hard to think of more appropriate terms. The Justice Department may not have been technically spying, and seeking to crack open metadata from cell phones isn't really wiretapping, but the DOJ was absolutely surveilling member of Congress and their families, including their minor children.

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