The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

While some continue to question President Donald Trump’s fitness for office, he’s doing himself no favors by talking incoherently and seeming to claim he has wide-ranging powers even before he was ever elected.

In comments to The Hill, Trump said in a recent interview that he should have fired former FBI Director James Comey — an action that launched special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into the president and his campaign — long before he was even president.

“If I did one mistake with Comey, I should have fired him before I got here. I should have fired him the day I won the primaries,” Trump told the outlet. “I should have fired him right after the convention, say I don’t want that guy. Or at least fired him the first day on the job. … I would have been better off firing him or putting out a statement that I don’t want him there when I get there.”

At one point in the quote, Trump seems to perhaps realize that what he’s saying is nonsensical. He had no capacity, of course, to fire Comey before his inauguration. He tries to cover this up a bit by suggesting he could have put a statement out that he would fire Comey if elected, but even this makes little sense.

By the time Trump had one the Republican primaries, Comey had yet to come out with his controversial statement that both exonerated Hillary Clinton of any criminal activity regarding her private email server while also harshly criticizing her actions. That breach of procedure, along with his decision to send Congress a letter saying he was reopening the investigation days before the election, was a part of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s justification for firing Comey.

But of course, we know why Trump fired Comey, and it has nothing to do with Rosenstein’s justifications. He didn’t like that Comey was overseeing the Russia investigation that was examining ties between his campaign and the Kremlin. Trump’s post-hoc claims and justifications — even the assertions that are obviously absurd — are just more smoke and mirrors designed to distract from that fact.

Cody Fenwick is a reporter and editor. Follow him on Twitter @codytfenwick.

 

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Donald Trump

Youtube Screenshot

Donald Trump has invoked his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent in a civil case, and if he ever stands trial on criminal charges, neither a judge or a jury may take that as evidence of guilt. But in the court of common sense, we are entitled to reach the obvious conclusion: Trump has committed crimes and wants to keep them secret.

The Fifth Amendment privilege, after all, is not to refuse to exonerate oneself. It's to refuse to incriminate oneself. Answering questions truthfully, as a rule, is incriminating only to someone who has done something wrong.

Keep reading... Show less

A pro-Trump demonstrator outside FBI office in Phoenix, Arizona with tactical gear and weapons

Youtube Screenshot

Video captured by the independent media site News2Share shows supporters of former President Donald Trump armed with guns, waving confederate and American flags outside of the FBI office in Phoenix, Arizona on Saturday.

"We're here in support of Trump, for what happened to him, the unlawful search with the FBI at his Mar-a-Lago home," someone at the demonstration told News2Share. "We are sick and tired of this tyrannical government called the Biden regime. We will not stand by and we will not stand down.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}