The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Speaking for the first time in public about his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election, Special Counsel Robert Mueller said bluntly that his findings did not exonerate President Trump — and that any consequences for Trump’s alleged attempts to obstruct the probe are in the hands of Congress. With the investigation now closed Mueller said he is resigning from the Justice Department, where he delivered his briefing, and reiterated that he prefers not to testify publicly in Congress.

“It is important that the office’s written work speak for itself,” he said.

Mueller stated plainly that his office could not charge Trump with obstruction of justice or any other crime because of Justice Department guidelines that prohibit the indictment of a sitting president. To do so, he added, would be both unfair and unconstitutional. And he noted that the Constitution provides other avenues, beyond the justice system, to deal with presidential wrongdoing (although he did not mention the word “impeachment.”)

He left no doubt about his report’s conclusions about a massive and wide-ranging effort by the Russian government to defeat Hillary Clinton in 2016. As for the Trump campaign, he said clearly that his team found “insufficient evidence” of conspiracy with the Russians — stopping well short of the White House claims of “no collusion.”

Mueller’s remarks about presidential obstruction of justice were even more damaging. “If we had confidence the President clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so,” he said.

The former FBI director concluded with a strong statement praising the prosecutors, investigators, and other staffers who worked with him for the past two years, implicitly rebuking Trump and others who have repeatedly attacked them. And he warned that the underlying subject of his report — the Russian attempt to subvert the democratic process — deserves the nation’s full attention.

Watch his full statement below:

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Roe V. Wade being overturned can impact midterm elections

YouTube Screenshot

The fate of abortion rights is now in the hands of voters after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned decades of settled precedent in its ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is not a right under the U.S. Constitution.

Now that state legislatures are able to pass bills that restrict abortion, the outcome of elections for governors, attorneys general, and state lawmakers will determine whether abortion remains legal and how draconian bans will be.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}