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Jon Stewart looked at the problems facing the thousandth or so new candidate for the Republican nomination, Chris Christie: He’s not only is he completely unpopular back home in New Jersey, but “you’ve already finished second in the loud, Northeastern egomaniac primary” — to Donald Trump.

Jon also interviewed Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) — who did a decent job as a comedic straight woman, talking about how well she works with all those presidential candidates that Jon keeps ridiculing. They also spoke about serious issues, involving the government’s aid to 9/11 emergency workers who are still suffering illnesses.

Larry Wilmore looked at the Obama administration’s proposed new regulations for overtime pay, versus the response from big business — like the White Castle executive who calls his company’s overworked and underpaid employees “Hamburger Heroes.”

Conan O’Brien talked about the split between Donald Trump and Macy’s — and the lengths that men will have to go now, if they really want to look like Donald Trump.

Jimmy Kimmel gave a full celebrity makeover to the newly-crowned “World’s Ugliest Dog” — making her now “the World’s Most Beautiful Dog.”

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Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

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