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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

A mass shooting killed one person and wounded two others Wednesday morning at an office complex in Phoenix, AZ. The shooting occurred at the same time the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on gun legislation in the wake of the massacre in Newtown, CT.

The incident was reported at around 10:45 a.m. local time and took place in central Phoenix at around 16th Street and Glendale Avenues. According to reports, police believe the suspect left the building and is at large. A local ABC affiliate reports that “Phoenix police Sgt. Tommy Thompson said a suspect went into the office building and shot several people.”

Earlier in the morning, Tucson shooting survivor Gabrielle Giffords gave testimony before the Senate committee, saying “violence is a big problem. Too many children are dying. Too many children. We must do something. It will be hard but the time is now. You must act. Be bold. Be courageous. Americans are counting on you.”

Since the Newtown mass shooting, a Slate gun-death tally reports that 1,440 Americans have been killed by guns. A teenager who performed at President Obama’s inauguration was among them, as she was gunned down in Chicago.

Update: On Thursday a second victim died after being taken off life support. The perpetrator also was found dead Thursday from an apparent self-inflicted gun wound. The third victim was shot in the hand and is expected to survive.

 

 

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