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Trump caravan in Portland

Photo by Garrison Davis/ Twitter


Following the arrival of a caravan of armed Trump supporters in Portland on Saturday, their confrontation with Black Lives Matter protesters escalated into a shooting incident that left one man dead. He was idenfitied escended on Portland to confront anti-racist protesters in an incident that resulted in at least one fatal shooting.

More than 36 hours later, law enforcement authorities have released few details about the incident. Portland police have not yet identified the victim, who was shot in the chest. Although they have confirmed that the killing is being investigated as a homicide, they have yet to arrest a suspect.

The evening of violence began with a "Trump 2020 Cruise Rally in Portland," which came into the city from nearby Clackamas, Oregon. Video footage from CNN affiliate KOIN showed pickup trucks with Trump 2020 flags prominently displayed.

Portland police sought to keep the caravan from entering the downtown area, according to Police Chief Chuck Lovell, but a number of vehicles were able to "come into the downtown core." Violence soon broke out between the Trump rallygoers and anti-racist counter-demonstrators, as videos posted by a New York Times reporter showed.

A witness to the shooting who posted some video on Facebook told CNN that he "didn't hear much lead up to it."

"I heard like three seconds of yelling and saw a guy spray bear mace," he told CNN. "The victim sprayed mace and launched it right into the other guy." CNN reported that it has not confirmed whether the victim is the person who sprayed mace.

CNN and other news outlets reported that he man who died was wearing a hat with the insignia of Patriot Prayer, a far-right group that has clashed with protesters in the past.


Photo by archer10 (Dennis) / CC BY-SA 2.0

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For months, one postal worker had been doing all she could to protect herself from COVID-19. She wore a mask long before it was required at her plant in St. Paul, Minnesota. She avoided the lunch room, where she saw little social distancing, and ate in her car.

The stakes felt especially high. Her husband, a postal worker in the same facility, was at high risk because his immune system is compromised by a condition unrelated to the coronavirus. And the 20-year veteran of the U.S. Postal Service knew that her job, operating a machine that sorts mail by ZIP code, would be vital to processing the flood of mail-in ballots expected this fall.

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