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As the Supreme Court has announced it will hear a challenge to Obama’s health care overhaul, it is worth noting that a majority of Americans now support one of the law’s most controversial elements.

A new CNN/ORC International poll found that 52 percent of those surveyed favor requiring all Americans to have health insurance, up from 44 percent in June.

“The health insurance mandate has gained most support since June among older Americans and among lower-income Americans,” says CNN Polling Director Keating Holland. “A majority of independents opposed the measure in June, but 52 percent of them now favor it.”

The shift in public opinion signifies that popular criticism of “Obamacare” is declining, despite continued efforts by conservatives — including the lobbyist wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas — to overturn the law on grounds of constitutionality.

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Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell said failure to pay US debts is 'just not something we can contemplate'

Washington (AFP) - The chairman of the US Federal Reserve called on lawmakers to raise the nation's borrowing limit urgently on Wednesday, warning that failure to pay government debts would do "severe damage" to the economy.

"It's just very important that the debt ceiling be raised in a timely fashion so the United States can pay its bills when it comes due," Jerome Powell said as the central bank concluded its September meeting. Failure to pay, he added, is "just not something we can contemplate."

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