The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Photo by MDGovpics/ CC BY 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Here's more of that other "Trump Effect" we've talked about before: new polling from Pew Research this week continues to confirm that Americans have only become more welcoming of immigrants and refugees since 2016 and Donald Trump's ensuing xenophobic presidency.

"In 2016 voters were about evenly divided in the share saying that the growing number of newcomers strengthens American society," Pew said, finding that 46 percent of all voters agreed with the statement. Four years later, that number has now surged to 60 percent. Americans "across the political spectrum have shifted in a more liberal direction in this domain," researchers said.


Previous polling has similarly found that as the impeached president has spent years pushing horrible anti-immigrant policy after horrible anti-immigrant policy, Americans have been viewing immigration more and more favorably—and sometimes in historic numbers.

Gallup this past summer found that 34 percent of Americans wanted to see more immigrants welcomed to the U.S., "the highest support for expanding immigration Gallup has found in its trend since 1965," the organization said. "Meanwhile, the percentage favoring decreased immigration has fallen to a new low of 28 percent, while 36 percent think it should stay at the present level."

"This marks the first time in Gallup's trend that the percentage wanting increased immigration has exceeded the percentage who want decreased immigration," Gallup noted.

"Supporters of both major party candidates this year are more likely than 2016 supporters to have positive views of immigrants to the United States," Pew found.

The research notes that while supporters of 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton were overwhelmingly pro-immigrant, 2020 Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's supporters showed an even larger share. Both candidates still unsurprisingly eclipsed pro-immigrant views among Trump's supporters, though Pew noted that even they saw a growth compared to 2016 (though in the end they're still voting for a racist, mass deportation candidate).

See more of Pew Research's findings here. Nearly four years of inhumane and oftentimes illegal policies have shown us that Trump's views on immigrants and refugees have only worsened since 2016. But Americans' views have not. Let us hope that translates at the ballot box in November.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Tyler Matzek

So the World Series has come around again, evoking the usual mixed feelings. For one thing, I don't have a team this year, although I'll be pulling for Atlanta in honor of my friend Lauren, a serious Braves fan I pretty much talked into baseball when she was my student. As a sometime athlete and a serious reader with a taste for complex narratives, she was a natural.

Also, the Houston Astros cheated. Bigtime. Cunning and crude, the team's 2017 electronic sign-stealing, trashcan-banging scheme tipping hitters to incoming pitches could have been designed by Vladimir Putin. It wouldn't have bothered me if several Astros had been banished from baseball like Pete Rose, whose compulsive gambling hurt mainly himself.

Keep reading... Show less

Mark Meadows

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Legal experts including a Harvard professor and a top election and voting rights attorney are weighing in on Sunday night's bombshell report from Rolling Stone naming members of Congress and the Trump administration who were involved in the planning and organizing of the January 6 rally and/or "Trump's efforts to overturn his election loss," according to two of the planners of the "Stop the Steal" rally.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}