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National Memo editor-in-chief Joe Conason reported today that yet another witness is coming out of the woodwork and saying that Mitt Romney had an illegal, youthful habit of impersonating police officers. But he’s not the only man who enjoys himself in uniform.

Basketball Player Olden Polynice Flashed A Badge During A Traffic Dispute

In 2000, the seven-foot tall center for the Utah Jazz was arrested for flashing an honorary badge he received from the Los Angeles Police Department during a traffic dispute, where he followed a couple back to their house in West Valley, Utah. He claimed that he flashed the badge while identifying himself as a member of the Utah Jazz.

The Idaho Bar “Iron Horse” Was Plagued By A Fake Cop Who Tried To Take A Woman Home

The local news report also gave good advice on how to spot a fraud.

This Guy Tried To Get Out Of A Speeding Ticket By Waving Around A Gold Shield

It didn’t work.

A Man in Rochester Used Fake Jargon To Rob Someone At 1:30 In The Morning

The victim was approached by a man — never found by the real police — who yelled, “police, get on the ground!” and then shouted into a radio, “I have the 215 suspect.” He then ran off with a wad of cash.

Photo by Marvin Moose

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

A true blue wave in November would not only include former Vice President Joe Biden defeating President Donald Trump, but Democrats retaking the U.S. Senate, expanding their majority in the House of Representatives, and winning victories in state races. None of that is guaranteed to happen, but according to an article by Elena Schneider, James Arkin and Ally Mutnick in Politico, some Republican activists are worried that when it comes to U.S. Senate races and online fundraising, the GOP is falling short.

"The money guarantees Democrats nothing heading into November 2020," Schneider, Arkin and Mutnick explain. "But with President Donald Trump's poll numbers sagging and more GOP-held Senate races looking competitive, the intensity of Democrats' online fundraising is close to erasing the financial advantage incumbent senators usually enjoy. That's making it harder to bend their campaigns away from the national trend lines — and helping Democrats' odds of flipping the Senate."

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