The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Washington (AFP) – President Barack Obama will lay out his plan to reform the United States’ “broken” immigration system on Thursday, he said, accusing Washington of allowing the problem to fester.

Obama said he would follow up a televised address on Thursday with a visit the next day to a Las Vegas high school to promote his move to by-pass Congress and impose change through executive order.

“Everyone agrees that our immigration system is broken, unfortunately Washington has allowed the problem to fester for too long,” he said in a video message on the White House Facebook page.

“So what I’m going to be laying out is the things that I can do with my lawful authority as president to make the system work better, even as I continue to work with Congress and encourage them to get a bipartisan comprehensive bill that can solve the entire problem.”

In the U.S. midterm elections earlier this month, Obama’s Republican opponents secured control of both houses of Congress, further hurting any remaining hope he had of negotiating broad immigration reform.

But Obama has made it clear he intends to invoke the power of his office to impose new measures to protect from expulsion some of the 11 million undocumented migrants living in the United States.

Republican leaders have said they fiercely oppose any recourse by Obama to executive authority to force the issue and warned that this would make legislative reform harder.

AFP Photo/Brendan Smialowski

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Attorney General Merrick Garland

The coming weeks will be the most consequential of Merrick Garland's life — not just for the attorney general himself but for our country. Garland will have to decide, presumably with the support of President Joe Biden, how to address the looming authoritarian threat of former President Donald J. Trump and his insurrectionary gang. His first fateful choice will be how to deal with Stephen K. Bannon, the fascism-friendly, criminally pardoned former Trump senior adviser who has defied a subpoena from the House Select Committee investigating the events of Jan. 6.

That panel has issued a contempt citation of Bannon, which will reach the floor for approval by the full House early next week. When that resolution passes, as it assuredly will, Speaker Nancy Pelosi will ask the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia to open a prosecution of Bannon, which could ultimately cost him a year behind bars and a fine of $100,000. (Trump won't be able to deliver a pardon, as he did last January to save Bannon from prison for defrauding gullible Trumpists in a "build the wall" scheme.)

Keep reading... Show less

By Lisa Richwine and Bhargav Acharya

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A union that represents about 60,000 behind-the-scenes workers in film and television reached a tentative deal with producers on Saturday, averting a strike that threatened to cause widespread disruption in Hollywood, negotiators said.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}