The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Washington (AFP) – U.S. President Barack Obama on Monday urged a quick political transition in Iraq in a rebuke to controversial prime minister Nuri al-Maliki.

Obama said that he as well as Vice President Joe Biden called prime minister-designate Haidar al-Abadi to offer support, as US forces conduct air strikes against Sunni Islamist extremists who have swept across Iraq.

Stressing his position that there is “no American military solution” to the Iraq crisis, Obama called Abadi’s nomination to replace the controversial Nuri al-Maliki “a promising step.”

“The only lasting solution is for Iraqis to come together and form an inclusive government,” Obama said, after criticism that Maliki has ruled divisively to advance Iraq’s Shiite majority.

“This new leadership has a difficult task to regain the confidence of its citizens by governing inclusively and taking steps to demonstrate its resolve,” he told the press during his vacation in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.

Maliki has called the selection of Abadi, a member of his party, a violation of the Iraqi constitution carried out with U.S. support.

But Obama said he “pledged our support” to Abadi and called on him “to form a new cabinet as quickly as possible.”

“I urge all Iraqi political leaders to work peacefully through the political process in the days ahead,” Obama said.

AFP Photo/ Nicolas Kamm

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Rep. Devin Nunes

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Republican Rep. Devin Nunes of California is retiring from Congress at the end of 2021 to work for former President Donald Trump.

Keep reading... Show less

From left Ethan Crumbley and his parents Jennifer and James Crumbley

Mug shot photos from Oakland County via Dallas Express

After the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, then-Rep. Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican, evaded calls for banning weapons of war. But he had other ideas. The "more realistic discussion," Rogers said, is "how do we target people with mental illness who use firearms?"

Tightening the gun laws would seem a lot easier and less intrusive than psychoanalyzing everyone with access to a weapon. But to address Rogers' point following the recent mass murder at a suburban Detroit high school, the question might be, "How do we with target the adults who hand powerful firearms to children with mental illness?"

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}