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By Christine Mai-Duc, Los Angeles Times

President Barack Obama on Friday identified the first, and so far only, known American citizen aboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, which crashed in eastern Ukraine on Thursday.

Quinn Lucas Schansman had dual Dutch and American citizenship, Jen Psaki, a spokeswoman for the U.S. State Department, said on Twitter.
A Facebook profile appearing to belong to Schansman indicates that he was living in Amsterdam as of April, and attending the International Business School at Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

A photo posted by a woman who appears to be his girlfriend included numerous condolences from friends.

In a press conference, Obama called the plane crash a “global tragedy,” and said it should “snap everybody’s heads to attention” that the conflict in Ukraine has widespread consequences.

The president also called for an immediate ceasefire between pro-Russian separatists and Ukraine and a “credible international investigation” into the incident.

Obama also noted that separatists have received a “steady flow” of support from Russia, including anti-aircraft weapons.

“Evidence indicates that the plane was shot down by a surface-to-air missile,” the President said. “That shot was taken in a territory controlled by the Russian separatists.

AFP Photo/Dominique Faget

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