The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Jonathan Allen, Bloomberg News (TNS)

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is looking to announce his presidential bid the second week of April — if he decides to run — a person familiar with his plans said Tuesday.

The first-term Republican, who burst onto the political scene in the Tea Party election of 2010, is widely seen as a serious contender for his party’s nomination in 2016. His libertarian views — on issues ranging from foreign aid to criminal sentencing rules to monetary policy — provide a contrast with some of the other top-tier contenders in the GOP.

The senator has also been quick and relentless in attacking the Democratic front-runner, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The early April timeline would allow Paul to raise money for almost three full months before his first fundraising report would be due to the Federal Election Commission in mid-July.

The New York Times reported Tuesday night that he has circled April 7 as a preferred announcement date.

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell said failure to pay US debts is 'just not something we can contemplate'

Washington (AFP) - The chairman of the US Federal Reserve called on lawmakers to raise the nation's borrowing limit urgently on Wednesday, warning that failure to pay government debts would do "severe damage" to the economy.

"It's just very important that the debt ceiling be raised in a timely fashion so the United States can pay its bills when it comes due," Jerome Powell said as the central bank concluded its September meeting. Failure to pay, he added, is "just not something we can contemplate."

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}