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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson officially ended his bid for the White House on Friday after failing to win any of the early states in the race for the November election.

“There are a lot of people who love me, they just won’t vote for me,” Carson said in a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

Carson had announced on Wednesday he did not see a “political path forward” in his campaign for the party’s nomination, and had not attended the Republican debate in Michigan on Thursday.

(Reporting by Megan Cassella and Emily Flitter; Editing by Mohammad Zargham)

Photo: Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ben Carson appears during a commercial break in a campaign town hall hosted by CNN in Greenville, South Carolina in this February 17, 2016 file photo. REUTERS/Rainier Ehrhardt/Files

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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