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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Republicans spent the first few weeks after the so-called sequester went into effect accusing President Obama of exaggerating its consequences. And as soon as the cuts began to affect them and their donors, they blamed the president for not cutting “fairly.”

When that didn’t work, they just restored the cuts they didn’t like — the ones that made their planes late.

But the real joke of the sequester, as the Daily Show‘s Aasif Mandvi shows, is that it mostly affects poor people. Defense contractors can shift budgets, but homebound seniors can’t find affordable alternatives to Meals on Wheels.

In all 50 states, the sequester is making life more miserable for the most vulnerable. And if that’s funny to you, you must read the Ryan Budget for laughs.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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