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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis

Photo from Ron DeSantis' official Facebook

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Florida Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis continued to push his dangerous anti-vaxx policies and his promotion of expensive treatment versus prevention, announcing that "it really doesn't impact me or anyone else" if someone gets vaccinated, which is false.

"I don't want a biomedical security state," said the GOP governor, whose state now ranks 26th in full-vaccination rate of those 18 or older.

"At the end of the day, the vaccines have helped people ward off severe illness, and you know, we obviously worked very hard to distribute it. At the end of the day though, it is what somebody, it's about your health and whether you want that protection or not, it really doesn't impact me or anyone else because we've seen the data on that."

The coronavirus is transmitted through the air.

A study published in July in The New England Journal of Medicine finds that vaccinated individuals "are likely to be less contagious than unvaccinated people and don't transmit the virus as much to others," WebMD reports.

More vaccinated people mean less infections, more hospital beds, fewer cases of long-term COIVD, fewer deaths, and less chance of new strains or variants cropping up.

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Attorney General Merrick Garland

Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

The Department of Justice had the kind of pro-police reform week that doesn't happen every year. In a seven-day period, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced a ban on chokeholds and no-knock warrants, an overhaul on how to handle law enforcement oversight deals, and a promise to make sure the Justice Department wasn't funding agencies that engage in racial discrimination.

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FBI Director Faces Sharp New Scrutiny Over Kavanaugh Probe

Photo by Federal Bureau of Investigation (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

When then-U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was accused of sexual misconduct by Christine Blasey Ford — a psychology professor at Palo Alto University — in 2018, the FBI conducted an investigation. But Kavanaugh's critics argued that the investigation should have been much more comprehensive in light of the fact that then-President Donald Trump had nominated him for a lifetime appointment on the highest judicial body in the United States. FBI Director Christopher Wray's handling of that investigation, according to Guardian reporter Stephanie Kirchgaessner, continues to be scrutinized three years later.

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