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New Hampshire voters delivered a narrow but clear victory toSenator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, as he edged outformer South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg for first place by less than 5,000votes. But the surprise of the nation’s first 2020 primary was a close thirdplace finish by Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), counted out by many observers onlya week ago, who now becomes a serious contender in the party’s more moderatewing.

Sanders and Buttigieg each earned nine of the state’s 24 conventiondelegates, while Klobuchar took the remaining six. Trailing badly behind thefront runners were Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) in fourth place and formerVice President Joe Biden in fifth. Biden left New Hampshire on Tuesday to flyto South Carolina, which will hold its primary on February 29.

With more than nine out of ten precincts counted, theWashington Post reported that Sanders had won with nearly 26 percent. Buttigieghad over 24 percent, Klobucher had almost 20 percent, Warren had just over nine percent and Biden had just overeight percent.

Not appearing on the New Hampshire ballot was former NewYork City mayor Mike Bloomberg. But the billionaire received enough write-in votesto win the hamlet of Dixville Notch, which traditionally reports its resultsshortly after midnight.

Finishing last among the Democratic contenders, tech entrepreneurAndrew Yang announced late Tuesday that he will end his quixotic bid for theparty’s nomination, which drew a small but loyal following. Senator MichaelBennet (D-CO) also said he would end his longshot bid.

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