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Stephen Colbert isn’t impressed by the grandiose title affixed to Trump’s first federal budget, “A New Foundation For American Greatness,” and notes that the president and his budget director Mick Mulvaney are “building that new foundation for American greatness on the ground-up bones of poor people.”

Among the many cuts that violate decency are huge reductions in SNAP, the food stamp program, and CHIP, the children’s health insurance program created by the late Senator Ted Kennedy and Hillary Clinton, back in 1997 when she was first lady. (It has saved millions of children’s lives since then.)

“I know this is an unpopular position these days,” Colbert confesses, “but I believe children should go to the doctor and eat. Where do I find the courage?” He also points out the irony that seems to have occurred to everyone but the #MAGA crowd, namely that this budget “is particularly cruel to one minority group: Trump’s voters.”

And he’s worried by the ruinous spending cuts slated for the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control: “Whenever that thing inside Steve Bannon bursts out and goes airborne, we won’t be prepared for it.”

It’s funny, if you take your humor very dark.

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A scene from "Squid Game" on Netflix

Reprinted with permission from Responsible Statecraft

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Reprinted with permission from Creators

In New York City, a statue of Thomas Jefferson has graced the City Council chamber for 100 years. This week, the Public Design Commission voted unanimously to remove it. "Jefferson embodies some of the most shameful parts of our country's history," explained Adrienne Adams, a councilwoman from Queens. Assemblyman Charles Barron went even further. Responding to a question about where the statue should go next, he was contemptuous: "I don't think it should go anywhere. I don't think it should exist."

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