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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

A day after the Senate rejected four gun control measures in the wake of the Orlando shooting, a bipartisan group of 9 senators expressed their willingness to compromise on gun control.

During the press conference, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine presented new legislation meant to prevent people on the no-fly list and the selective screening list from buying guns. The bill would allow people on theses lists to appeal the decision.

“If we can’t pass this, it truly is a broken system up here,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham about the bipartisan attempt at compromise.

“The likelihood of someone being on this list and buying a gun to use it in a terrorist act to me is far greater than the likelihood of an innocent person being on the list,” Graham said, referring to Republican’s argument against barring people on the terror watch list from buying guns.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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