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Fox News Anchors Insist That Infrastructure Isn’t Really ‘Infrastructure’

Reprinted with permission from Media Matters

Fox News is mounting a rhetorical push against President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan announced on Wednesday and is trying to declare that a number of projects mentioned in the bill aren't "infrastructure" — even when they obviously are.

According to Fox's purported "news side" personalities as well as segments from opinion hosts, only roads and bridges actually qualify for the label — which leaves out the following: The electrical grid, broadband internet, building construction, plumbing networks, and who knows what else.

On Thursday morning's edition of America's Newsroom, Fox News anchor Bill Hemmer asked Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg why only a portion of the spending money was "dedicated to roads and bridges," instead highlighting the bill's investments in "electric grid improvements, broadband, water systems, and on and on it goes."

Buttigieg then explained what was wrong with this argument: The electric grid, broadband internet, and other technologies are part of the infrastructure of a modern economy.


This line of argument, suggesting that various areas of technology don't really count as "infrastructure," began even before Biden delivered his speech. And it also becomes clear that Fox's goalposts have kept on moving.

On Wednesday's edition of Your World with Neil Cavuto, Fox News White House correspondent Peter Doocy said that there are "still some infrastructure priorities in this package," such as money for roads and bridges, as well as to replace all the lead pipes still being used in the country, and $213 billion for environmentally sustainable housing.

But other items, shown in a list on screen, included "$174 billion to 'win' electric vehicle market" — as if the emerging market of electric vehicles doesn't require a public strategy.


But then in the very next hour on The Five, co-host Jesse Watters contrasted the problem of potholes on the highways with building "a lot of electric car charging stations for all the Tesla drivers," though the bill also includes basic money for roads. He also complained about the environmental improvements to buildings, casting it as wasteful: "If they retrofit every single building here in Manhattan, I'm going to have a headache with all the hammering. It's enough already."


Similarly, Sean Hannity remarked on Wednesday night that a large portion of the bill would be dedicated to such purportedly non-infrastructure projects as "retrofitting millions of homes and hospitals and other buildings in an environmentally conscious way and other funds would go towards building new green schools."


Hannity also brought on South Dakota Republican Gov. Kristi Noem, who declared: "I was shocked by how much doesn't go into infrastructure. It goes into research and development. It goes into housing, and pipes, and different initiatives, green energy, and it really is not an honest conversation we're having about what this proposal is."


The next morning, Fox & Friends co-host Ainsley Earhardt reaired the clip of Noem's comments. Keep in mind, of course, that Doocy's earlier segment had included the replacement of lead pipes and housing improvements as part of the genuine "infrastructure" components of the package. But now, the network will run that clip of Noem as a serious statement, even after it was widely reported and lampooned the night before.

New Poll: Americans Say Tax Wealthy And Corporations To Fund Infrastructure Program

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

President Joe Biden's plan to tax the rich to pay for an infrastructure bill that fixes the country's aging roads, bridges, and transit systems is broadly popular, according to a new Politico/Morning Consult poll published on Wednesday.

The poll found that 54 percent of Americans support raising taxes on corporations and those earning more than $400,000 per year in order to pay for the infrastructure plan, as opposed to 27 percent who said that the proposal should be paid for without those tax increases.

What's more, 57 percent of Americans said they would be more likely to support the infrastructure plan if it raised taxes on people earning more than $400,000, while just 17 percent said it would make them less likely to support the proposal.

The poll comes after several Republicans have pooh-poohed the idea. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said there won't be "any enthusiasm on our side for a tax increase" and called the infrastructure plan a "trojan horse" for tax increases.

Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) literally laughed when asked whether she supports raising taxes to pay for an infrastructure plan, MSNBC reported.

"I would not anticipate that it would be well received," Collins said of using tax hikes to pay for infrastructure legislation.

Republicans remain against raising taxes to pay for the infrastructure plan, despite recently raising concerns over the federal deficit. Rising federal deficits were the reason some GOP lawmakers gave to justify their opposition to the popular coronavirus relief bill Democrats passed earlier this month.

Ultimately, just 1.8 percent of taxpayers earn more than $400,000 per year, according to CNBC. Because of the way tax policy in the United States works, only the income over $400,000 would be taxed at a higher rate. For example, a married couple that earns a combined $450,000 would only see a tax increase on the $50,000.

According to CNBC, Biden's infrastructure plan includes $621 billion for repairing bridges, airports, roads, and public transit; $300 billion to upgrade "drinking-water infrastructure, expanding broadband access, and upgrading electric grids;" and $300 billion to build and update schools, among other facilities.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Biden Kicks Off Effort To Reshape Economy With Infrastructure Plan

By Jarrett Renshaw (Reuters) - President Joe Biden on Wednesday will call for a dramatic and more permanent shift in the direction of the U.S. economy with a roughly $2 trillion package to invest in traditional projects like roads and bridges alongside tackling climate change and boosting human services like elder care. He also aims to put corporate America on the hook for the tab, which is expected to grow to a combined $4 trillion once he rolls out the second part of his economic plan in April. Coupled with his recently enacted $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, Biden's infrastructure...