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Preparing To Run For Senate, Lewandowski Mocks NH Republicans

Corey Lewandowski, Trump’s former campaign manager, spent Tuesday insulting Republicans in New Hampshire as he prepares to launch a bid hoping to be the Republican nominee for Senate in New Hampshire.

In comments on Tuesday’s “John Fredericks Show,” a Virginia-based radio program, Lewandowski took a page from his former boss, implying that he, and he alone, can save the New Hampshire Republican Party.

“They have decimated the Republican Party in the state,” Lewandowski says of current Republican officials in the state. “And if they think nominating somebody other than Corey Lewandowski … is going to be a recipe for success, then they deserve to lose,” he added.

Lewandowski also blasted Republicans in the state for “making the same mistakes that the Republican establishment has made for too long.”

Lewandowski has not officially launched a Senate bid, but his comments on Tuesday’s program point to him tossing his hat in the ring.

If he gets in the race, he would compete with other Republicans for the chance to take on incumbent Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, a popular ex-governor who ousted an incumbent Republican in 2008 and fended off a Republican challenger in 2014.

March 2019 poll shows Shaheen leading both New Hampshire Republican Gov. John Sununu and former Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte. At the time of the poll, Lewandowski had not expressed interest in running.

Lewandowski has faced a fair bit of controversy since his rise to power within the Trump campaign. During the 2016 race, he was arrested and charged with battery after assaulting a female reporter on the campaign trail. The charges were eventually dropped.

After Trump got in office, Lewandowski joined a lobbying firm hoping to sell access to Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. He eventually resigned after refusing to register as a lobbyist.

It appears Lewandowski wants to take his scandal-plagued baggage to New Hampshire and jump in the Senate race. And if his radio appearance is any indication, New Hampshire Republicans should be prepared to be berated and insulted along the way.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

John McCain: Suppressing Free Press Is ‘How Dictators Get Started’

MUNICH (Reuters) – Senator John McCain, defending the media against the latest attack by President Donald Trump, warned that suppressing the free press was “how dictators get started”.

The Arizona Republican, a frequent critic of Trump, was responding to a tweet in which Trump accused the media of being “the enemy of the American people”.

The international order established after World War Two was built in part on a free press, McCain said in an excerpt of an interview with NBC’s Meet the Press that was released in advance of the full Sunday morning broadcast.

“I hate the press. I hate you especially,” he told interviewer Chuck Todd from an international security conference in Munich. “But the fact is we need you. We need a free press. We must have it. It’s vital.”

“If you want to preserve – I’m very serious now – if you want to preserve democracy as we know it, you have to have a free and many times adversarial press. And without it, I am afraid that we would lose so much of our individual liberties over time. That’s how dictators get started,” he continued.

“They get started by suppressing free press. In other words, a consolidation of power. When you look at history, the first thing that dictators do is shut down the press. And I’m not saying that President Trump is trying to be a dictator. I’m just saying we need to learn the lessons of history,” McCain said.

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen, a Democrat from New Hampshire, told the conference on Sunday she was also concerned about Trump’s comments.

“The real danger is the president’s criticism of the media,” Shaheen told the conference. “A free press … is very important to maintaining democracy, and efforts on the part of a president to undermine and manipulate the press are very dangerous.”

The comments from U.S. lawmakers followed Trump’s tweet and came days after the president held a raucous news conference at which he repeatedly criticized news reports about disorder in the White House and leaks of his telephone conversations with the leaders of Mexico and Australia.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel emphasized the importance of a free press at the conference on Saturday, saying, “I have high respect for journalists. We’ve always had good results, at least in Germany, by relying on mutual respect.”

(Reporting by Jonathan Landay and Andrea Shalal; Editing by Mark Potter and David Stamp)

IMAGE: U.S. Senator John McCain speaks at the opening of the 53rd Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, February 17, 2017. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Is It Time To Put A Woman’s Face On The $20 Bill?

By Bruce Newman, San Jose Mercury News (TNS)

SAN JOSE, California — There are more $20 bills in circulation than there are humans on the planet — 8.1 billion in all — and as the only denomination issued by most ATMs, it has become America’s most indispensable currency. Given the role of symbolism in a system that assigns value to paper currency because that’s what the government says it’s worth, the symbolic importance of being the hood ornament on our most useful bill cannot be overstated.

As a great sucking sound arose from the U.S. Treasury at April 15’s tax filing deadline, the government began considering a measure that for the first time could result in a woman’s face appearing on the $20 bill. In a five-finger exercise of Capitol Hill’s purse string power, Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), introduced the Women on the Twenty Act — legislation undoubtedly destined to be better remembered as the $20 Bill.

Demonstrating $20/$20 political foresight, a grass-roots campaign called Women on 20s had already done the spadework of formulating an all-female cast of potential replacements for Andrew Jackson, who brought his high forehead, tall hair and regrettable history as a slave owner and persecutor of Native Americans to the $20 bill in 1928. The campaign wants “Old Hickory” sent to the woodshed, and it got nearly half a million online voters to narrow the field to abolitionist Harriet Tubman, civil rights icon Rosa Parks, activist first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and the first female Cherokee chief — who also brings the perfect name to the job — Wilma Mankiller.

It’s been almost 90 years since any of the seven common denominations of U.S. currency changed its portrait, with Grover Cleveland getting booted upstairs to the $1,000 bill in favor of Jackson. “I think it’s a huge deal, and it’s been a long time coming,” says Manning Garrett, owner of Manifest Auctions in Greenville, S.C., which deals in rare and collectible currencies. “A lot of European countries have gone to more relevant scientific or business people, as opposed to just politicians. In this day and age, it’s probably not appropriate to have former slave owners on every single piece of our paper money.”

Oh yes, that. The undeniable taint of slavery attaches to the $1 (George Washington), $2 (Thomas Jefferson), $20 (Jackson) and $100 (Ben Franklin) bills. And, of course, all of the faces on our paper money are male. Susan B. Anthony and Sacagawea, the only women ever represented on U.S. currency, were relegated to the rare — and not in a good way — dollar coin.

“Men have always been in the positions of power that choose these things,” says Pam Vogt, owner of Camino Coin Co. in Burlingame, “but we have had women who stood out in history for as many years as there have been men on the bills.” She’s a Tubman supporter.

Women have been heard on matters of money at the highest levels — the Fed’s chairwoman is Janet Yellen — but they have rarely showed their faces in a bankroll. That hasn’t been a problem for other countries, especially England, where you can’t order a plate of bangers and mash without forking over a bill bearing the likeness of Queen Elizabeth II. The Bank of England announced recently it would replace the eminent naturalist Charles Darwin on the ten pound note with author Jane Austen in 2017.

Austen’s heyday was the early 19th century, and generally speaking, central banks seem to prefer currency cover girls that are a couple of hundred years dead. The fact that America’s incumbent bill boys are all white guys, coupled with an obvious desire that any change in currency reflect the nation’s ethnic diversity, could work in favor of a noncontroversial figure like Pocahontas, the 17th-century Indian princess. The only face certain not to appear on the $20 bill is a living one.

That will come as a blow to Silicon Valley — irrepressible domain of now and the next big thing — where business titans such as Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg and Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer are disqualified by virtue of having a pulse, and feminist martyr Ellen Pao has a better chance of being the face of the next Kleiner Perkins funding round than the $20 bill.

When it comes to folding money, the U.S. Treasury is like that kid in “The Sixth Sense” — it sees dead people. That’s because of the numismatically notorious Spencer M. Clark, who was superintendent of the National Currency Bureau in 1864, when Congress authorized printing the nation’s first fractional currency notes. Clark decided to put his own picture on the five-cent note, creating a scandal of such magnitude that the bill was immediately retired.

Shaheen’s $20 Bill is unlikely to seek a standard-bearer who would cause $162 billion to be pulled from circulation. After all, she represents a state whose motto is “Live Free or Die.” Her legislative agenda may now need to include running that idea through an ATM to see if there’s a woman willing to “Die for Twenty Bucks.”

Photo: The.Comedian via Flickr

Jeanne Shaheen Defeats Scott Brown In New Hampshire Senate Race

By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau (MCT)

New Hampshire Democrat Jeanne Shaheen won re-election to a second Senate term Tuesday, withstanding a late push by Republicans to use a toxic national political environment against her.

Shaheen, the first woman in the nation ever elected both governor and senator, relied on her track record in elective office and her well-honed political machine to fend off a challenge from former U.S. Sen. Scott Brown, a Republican who crossed the border from Massachusetts in a bid to return to the Senate.

The Associated Press called the race for Shaheen with about 32 percent of precincts reporting.

New Hampshire, where politics is an unofficial sport, has been particularly prone to swings in the national political climate. Shaheen lost her first bid for the Senate in 2002, but won a 2008 rematch against John Sununu on the back of President Barack Obama’s first race for the White House.

Brown would have become just the third person to represent multiple states in the Senate and the first since 1879.

In Massachusetts, he shocked the political world in 2010 by winning a special election to fill the seat held by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a Democrat. Brown’s victory was an early indicator of opposition to Obama’s health care law. But Brown lost his bid for a full six-year term in 2012 to Democrat Elizabeth Warren.

Photo: Roger H. Goun via Flickr