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Tag: mark meadows

Meadows Text Messages Reveal Details Of Trump's Georgia Scheming

Text messages obtained from Mark Meadows, a former White House chief of staff, are once again shedding light on the Trump campaign’s efforts to overturn the 2020 elections.

This time the spotlight is on Georgia, where former President Donald Trump tried to subvert the election by pressuring the secretary of state, Brad Raffensperger, in a now-infamous phone call, to “find” enough votes to overturn Joe Biden’s eventual victory after the former president’s narrow three-day lead.

On January 2, 2021, three days after calling for Georgia governor Brian Kemp’s resignation, Trump hopped on an hour-long call with Raffensperger and claimed — falsely, of course — that it was “pretty clear” he had “won” Georgia, weeks after the state’s top officials defied death threats to officially certify Biden as the winner of the state’s electoral votes.

As Trump urged Raffensperger to “find 11,780 votes, which is one more than we have [to get],” Jordan Fuchs, Georgia's deputy secretary of state, pleaded with Meadows to end the call.

"Need to end this call," Fuchs told Meadows. "I don't think this will be productive much longer." Fuchs later added, “Let’s save the relationship,” according to a new CNN report.

The correspondence is part of a large trove of text messages from Meadow’s phone submitted by the House Select Committee in a recent court filing.

The hour-long call is at the heart of a Georgian investigation into whether Trump and his allies’ actions to overturn the state’s election results were criminal, and state prosecutors have convened a special grand jury to hear evidence and, if needed, subpoena witnesses and documents to bolster the state’s investigation.

Perdue 'Doing What You And President Want'

David Perdue, who lost his Senate seat to Democrat Jon Ossoff in a January 5, 2021, runoff election, reentered the political landscape last year to challenge Kemp in the governor’s race at a time Trump was on the lookout for a challenger to primary the incumbent governor.

Perdue won Trump’s coveted endorsement and has since embraced and parroted the former president’s baseless claims of fraud in the 2020 elections, even though multiple recounts confirmed his and Trump’s loss in the state.

CNN has released a fresh round of text messages that show Perdue, who was preparing for the Georgia Senate runoff, also partook in Trumpworld’s 2020 pressure campaign in Georgia.

“Carr,” Perdue wrote — referring to Georgia’s Attorney General, Chris Carr — “won’t be of any help with SOS.” Meadows received this text message on December 13, 2020. "I have a call into the Governor's general counsel now to see if they might help," Perdue added.

The text came days after Trump warned Carr not to rally GOP officials against a lawsuit that Texas filed with the U.S. Supreme Court to throw out millions of votes in Georgia and three other battleground states.

However, Carr, in brave defiance of Trump, assailed the lawsuit, calling it “constitutionally legally, and factually wrong,” and urged the justices to reject it.

Afterward, in a December 29 message, Perdue texted Meadows of his effort to arrange a meeting between Rudy Giuliani — the disgraced former Trump lawyer — and top Republican members of the Georgia state senate. "I'm trying to set up this call with state legislature leaders and Rudy," Perdue said. "I just want to make sure I'm doing what you and the president want."

“Great,” Meadows replied.

The next day, Giuliani appeared before the Georgia State Senate subcommittee to peddle lies and outlandish claims of election fraud.

Fani Willis, District Attorney of Fulton County, has been investigating Trump’s calls with Raffensperger and an official in his office; Guiliani’s falsehood-ridden presentation to Georgia lawmakers; Senator Lindsey Graham’s pressure phone call to Raffensperger; and the sudden resignation of Byung Pak, a former US attorney in Atlanta.

Investigators in Georgia have deposed 50 witnesses and plan to subpoena 30 others, according to CNN, an investigative process the special grand jury is expected to strengthen. "I imagine that we're going to be issuing subpoenas to a lot of people, and that all of them are not going to welcome our invitation to come speak with us," Willis told CNN.

Requests for comments sent to Fuchs, Perdue’s campaign, and Meadows went unanswered. Giuliani’s attorney didn’t comment on the text messages but said his client hadn’t been contacted by Georgian authorities.

Select Committee Depicts Meadows As Point Man In Trump Coup

The House Select Committee on January 6 filed a motion in court arguing that Trump’s former chief of staff Mark Meadows should be compelled to testify about his role in the plot to overturn the 2020 presidential election. The filing uses Meadows’ text messages and witness testimony to paint a detailed picture of Meadows as Trump’s insurrection point man.

Meadows was subpoenaed to testify before the committee in December, but at the last minute he announced that he’d had a change of heart. In true Trumpian fashion, rather than showing up to testify, Meadows sued the committee.

There are no facts in dispute.

Either Meadows has to testify or he doesn’t. Therefore, the committee asked the judge to dispense with the formality of a trial and simply rule on that question.


In their motion, the committee had to explain why Meadows’ claims of executive privilege are worthless. In order to make that case, the committee painted a detailed picture of what Meadows was up to in the weeks before the insurrection.

The record shows that Meadows coordinated with a clique of far-right members of Congress and outside operatives to hype election fraud lies and pressure the Department of Justice to validate those lies.

The affirmation of the nation’s top law enforcement agency would then be used to pressure legislatures in states that Biden won into calling themselves back into session to send fake Trump electors in place of the real Biden delegates.

The committee argues in effect that Meadows doesn’t have executive privilege because he was operating either as a campaign staffer or as a criminal, since his attempts to influence the election would constitute blatant violations of the Hatch Act if he acted as a federal official.

The 26 exhibits attached to the motion include some of the 2,319 text messages from Meadows’ personal phone that the former chief of staff had already handed over, plus excerpts from the testimony of various J6 witnesses, including Trump aide Jason Miller and Meadows aide Cassidy Hutchison.

Indeed, the exhibits are so voluminous that one suspects the committee is taking advantage of the filing to get some shocking details into the public record.

And not a moment too soon.

Hutchison told committee investigators that Meadows schemed with a clique of far-right representatives that included US Reps. Scott Perry, Jim Jordan and Louie Gohmert. The group’s role was to identify and amplify election fraud conspiracy theories.

Armed with these baseless allegations, the clique badgered Justice Department officials to investigate and validate the claims so that they could be used to pressure state legislatures into overriding the will of the people and sending Trump electors in place of those duly pledged to Biden.

The officials found no evidence of significant fraud in any state, but Trump and his allies kept pushing. “Just say that the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me and the R. Congressmen,” Trump said, according to notes taken by former senior Justice Department official Richard Donoghue and shared with the Times for a story that ran last December.

Donoghue later told the committee that he and his colleagues narrowly talked Trump out of firing the acting attorney general and replacing him with Jeff Clark, a toady who had never tried a criminal case, but who promised to throw the agency’s credibility behind the lies.

Meadows and Clark allegedly planned to use the fraud allegations to pressure the GOP-controlled legislatures of the Biden swing states to call themselves back into session to pick Republican electors.

The exhibits show that Meadows and his merry band of insurrectionists were big promoters of a John Eastman-esque pseudo-legal theory whereby Mike Pence could somehow send the election back to the states.

Gohmert even tried and failed to sue Pence in federal court to force him to act on a version of the Eastman plan to steal the election during the certification ceremony.

This filing sheds light on what the J6 committee has learned.

The good news is that they are getting closer to Trump, uncovering the machinations of high-level elected officials.

The bad news is that compelling members of Congress to testify will be time-consuming and difficult.

The clock is ticking for the committee.

Printed with permission from Alternet.

Endorse This: 'You're A Gossipy Little B*tch': Samantha Bee Unloads On Mark Meadows Texts (VIDEO)

Samantha Bee lambastes the treasure trove of damning text messages handed over to the House Select Committee by former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, which included more than 2,319 exchanges with various Trump sycophants and Republican lawmakers.

“Some of the most damning texts came on Election Day, like when Fox News host Sean Hannity promised Meadows he would push his listeners to get Trump elected,” she continues. When Meadows pressed Hannity to “stress every vote matters”, the host replied: “Yes sir. On it.”

Despite a flurry of frantic messages show some Trump aides, including Jared Kushner, citing evidence against Trump’s baseless election fraud claims, the White House continued shoveling the bull crap.

“Despite mounting worries, a total lack of fraud evidence and a warning about potential violence on January 6, Meadows and company went full speed ahead anyway,” Bee explained.

And much like myself and other comedians, Bee pointed out the hilarious misspelling of Martial Law by Marjorie 'Klan Mom' Greene.

“Of course, when it did turn violent, it wasn’t enough for true believers like Marjorie Taylor Greene,” who texted Meadows days later to suggest they stop Biden from taking office by having Trump declare “Marshall Law”.

“And if you’re thinking, ‘that’s not how you spell martial law,’ you are very correct,” Bee said, adding “Marshall’s Law, as everyone knows, is that no one should pay retail prices for quality yoga pants.

Watch The Clip Below:

Michael Hayne is a comedian, writer, voice artist, podcaster, and impressionist. Follow his work on Facebook and TikTok

Whining 'Marshall Law' Margie Blames Media For Her Dismal Reputation

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) recently gave an interview to Militant Church, a Catholic right-wing media outlet, in which she blamed the press – not her own actions and frequent gaffes – for the abysmal reputation that she has earned in the eyes of the American public.

"They don't really know me. And the reason that they don't know who I truly am is the media created a character of me and that's the character that they want to present to the American people," Greene claimed to host Michael Voris.

(She may have meant to use the term "caricature," but whatever. Who knows. My bad, I guess.)

"They don't want the American people to know that I'm a wife, a mother, and that I think being a mother is the best part of my life. They don't want the American people to understand that I'm actually very smart, successful in business, great with strategy, and very passionate and committed to serving in Congress but actually changing the way Congress works," she said.

"The media just doesn't want anyone to know that. They don't want anyone to like me," Greene complained, "because if they like me, then my ideas and policies and legislation will be successful. And the media is 'America Last.'"

See below via Right-Wing Watch:


Greene's first term in the House of Representatives began with her objecting to President Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 election and has been defined by her having latched onto former President Donald Trump's lie that the contest was stolen.

On Monday, text messages relating to the January 6th, 2021 Capitol insurrection between Greene and then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows showed that Greene lacks a basic grasp of fundamental topics.

"In our private chat with only Members, several are saying the only way to save our Republic is for Trump to call for Marshall law," Greene wrote on January 17th. "I don't know on those things. I just wanted you to tell him. They stole this election. We all know. They will destroy our country next. Please tell him to declassify as much as possible so we can go after Biden and anyone else!"

Solid plan: Twitter had some feedback for the freshman conspiracy theorist lawmaker.





It also bears noting the irony of Greene whining about not being "liked" when she aligns herself with the "fuck your feelings" Trump cult. And, like Trump, Greene was suspended from Twitter for spreading misleading information and outright propaganda.

Incredibly, later in the same interview, Greene called the Capitol a "glass castle that's empty of anything good" and referred to Congress as a "ship of fools" for whom she has "no respect." How this will endear her to more people is perplexing.

Greene also told Voris that "I don't even know why God has not destroyed us."

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

Mark ‘Election Integrity’ Meadows Was Illegally Registered To Vote In Three States

It hasn’t even been two weeks since we reported that Mark ‘Big Lie’ Meadows was removed from voter rolls in North Carolina after it was discovered he was registered in both Virginia and North Carolina.

Now it seems there’s yet another state the former President Trump lackey has registered in: South Carolina.

According to records obtained by The Washington Post, Meadows was registered in three different states for about three weeks.

Let’s not forget that Meadows serves as a senior partner at the Conservative Partnership Institute (CPI), a think tank devoted to “restor[ing] election integrity safeguards” the “left is trying to tear down.”

As first reported by The New Yorker in September 2020, about three weeks before North Carolina’s voter registration deadline for the general election, Meadows—a devout Stop the Stealer—claimed to be living in a 14-foot-by-62-foot mobile home in North Carolina, where he never actually lived. But he voted absentee using that address in the 2020 general election. Meadows, a former Asheville resident and Western North Carolina congressman, was living in Virginia at that time.

In March, an investigation into Meadows’ possible voter fraud was launched by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation.

“The allegations, in this case, involve potential crimes committed by a government official,” Macon County District Attorney Ashley Hornsby Welch wrote in a letter to the attorney general’s office on March 14, CNBC News reported.

Melanie Thibault, Macon County Board of Elections director, told the Asheville Citizen Times on April 12 that she consulted with the North Carolina Board of Elections staff after discovering that Meadows was registered in North Carolina and Virginia. The board removed him from their voter rolls.

"What I found was that he was also registered in the state of Virginia. And he voted in a 2021 election. The last election he voted in Macon County was in 2020," Thibault said.

In March 2022, Meadows registered to vote in South Carolina—while he was already registered in Virginia, where he voted in a 2021 election, while he was already registered absentee in North Carolina, where he voted in the 2020 general election. My head is spinning.

The issue is that when he registered to vote in South Carolina, he should have let the state know he was registered in Virginia. But according to Angie Maniglia Turner, the general registrar and director of elections in Alexandria, Virginia, neither Mark nor Debra Meadows had changed voter registration status in Virginia.

Come on, Mark. Get it together, man. One state, one vote. That’s how this whole process works.

Printed with permission from DailyKos.

Mark Meadows Was Registered To Vote In Three States At Once, Officials Say

Mark Meadows, former White House Chief of Staff for the Trump administration and purveyor of election fraud conspiracies, is facing increased scrutiny and fresh allegations of voter fraud after the Washington Post reported Friday that he was registered to vote in three states at the same time.

Meadows was registered to vote in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia at the same time for three weeks, election records obtained by the Post show. However, Meadows was purged from North Carolina’s voter roles last week by the State Board of Elections in an investigation by North Carolina’s attorney general and the State Bureau of Investigations into whether he had committed voter fraud.

The investigation kicked into gear after a New Yorker report that Meadows had registered to vote with the address of a mobile home he didn’t own and never lived in. The previous owner of the Scaly Mountain mobile home was shocked to learn that Meadows had listed that address because his wife had spent only two nights there, despite renting the place for a few months, the New Yorker added.

According to the Post, Meadows is still a registered voter in both South Carolina and Virginia. A representative for South Carolina Elections, Chris Whitmire, told the AP that Meadows and his wife, Debbie Meadows, registered to vote in March 2022, two weeks after the New Yorker published its report.

“[March 2022] is when [Meadows] became active,” Whitmire added in his response to the AP, implying that Meadows had yet to vote in South Carolina.

Meadows was a congressman from January 2013 until March 2020, after which he took up the post of then-President’s Trump fourth and final chief of staff. After Trump lost the 2020 presidential elections, Meadows joined a far-right institute that purported to promote “election integrity” and pushed lies of election fraud.

In an August 2020 interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper, Meadows whined about the inaccuracy in states’ voter rolls, saying, “I don’t want my vote or anyone else’s to be disenfranchised. … Do you realize how inaccurate the voter rolls are, with people just moving around? … Anytime you move, you’ll change your driver’s license, but you don’t call up and say, ‘Hey, by the way, I’m re-registering.’”

Apparently, Meadows didn’t tell Virginia he was re-registering when he signed up to vote in the Virginia gubernatorial elections the following year, a race Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin ended up winning.

Voter role inaccuracies evidently didn’t matter to Meadows anymore when he registered to vote in South Carolina last month, despite already being a registered voter in Virginia and North Carolina at the time.

In July 2021, Meadows splashed nearly $1.6 million on a three-story waterfront home in South Carolina, per the Post. While using the abandoned motor home in North Carolina as an address for his voter records, Meadows sold for $370,000 a Sapphire home where his mother lived and from which she voted for many years.

A representative for Mark Meadows refused to comment, and requests for comment left at the retirement community where his mother now resides went unanswered.

WATCH: Attorney General Dodges Question On Meadows Contempt Charge

A reporter at the Department of Justice on Friday asked Attorney General Merrick Garland the question that’s been on many minds of late: Why hasn’t former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows been formally charged with criminal contempt of Congress?

On December 14 the full House of Representatives sent DOJ a contempt of Congress referral for Meadows. Since that time even more damning information has been reported by the press.

The attorney general was not just unwilling to give a direct answer, he was unwilling to even confirm there was a referral sent to DOJ, a commonly-known fact that is also in the official Congressional Record.

"Four months is a gracious plenty of time to make a decision about whether to prosecute Meadows, especially since SCOTUS has mostly resolved the executive privilege argument,” former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance noted on Twitter.