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Danziger: All Play And No Work

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.com.

#EndorseThis: Trevor Noah Goes Behind That Oval Office Meeting

Like most of us, Trevor Noah is just not ready to see Donald Trump anywhere near the White House — let alone in the Oval Office, where he met yesterday with President Obama. The Daily Show host found it impossible not to imagine what both men were really thinking. And what might have been on the mind of the bust of Martin Luther King, Jr. that loomed behind Trump’s chair. But with the president’s sterling performance at this awkward and deeply unfortunate event, Noah sees a fresh honor in his future.

Endorse This: Nixon’s Invitation Got Lost In The Mail

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Losing to John F. Kennedy in 1960 wasn’t the only grudge that Richard M. Nixon held against the late Democratic president. For years after JFK’s assassination, Nixon was still looking for answers to one troubling question: Why was he never invited to the White House!? He laments and ruminates hilariously as a sycophantic Henry Kissinger nods…

Actor Harry Shearer takes the lead role in his forthcoming new series “Nixon’s The One” based on tape recordings from the Nixon White House. Click above to watch a clip — then share this video!

Video via Wall Street Journal Speakeasy Blog

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Norman Rockwell, Radical

Apparently a painting depicting the cold, hard facts of segregation and racial antagonism in the South in the middle of the twentieth century is a profound move with major political implications. Or so some would have us believe:

President Barack Obama has taken a decidedly low-key approach to racial issues since he became America’s first black president two years ago. But in a hallway outside the Oval Office, he has placed a head-turning painting depicting one of the ugliest racial episodes in U.S. history.

Norman Rockwell’s “The Problem We All Live With,” installed in the White House last month, shows U.S. marshals escorting Ruby Bridges, a 6-year-old African-American girl, into a New Orleans elementary school in 1960 as court-ordered integration met with an angry and defiant response from the white community.

The thrust of the painting is not subtle. America’s vilest racial epithet appears in letters several inches high at the top of the canvas. To the left side, the letters “KKK” are plainly visible. The crowds, mostly women who gathered daily to taunt Bridges as she went to a largely empty school, are not shown in the picture. But the racist graffiti and a splattered tomato convey the hostile atmosphere.

Digby gets this right: Our political discourse has become so finely tuned to the desires and wishes of white, working-class swing voters — a shrinking portion of the electorate the pundit class is obsessed with — that anything that could theoretically upset them (even if factual) should be kept quiet.