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Tag: republican voters

Poll: Most Republicans Want Trump To Run Again, But Most Americans Don't

A new poll suggests a majority of Republicans want former President Donald Trump to try for the White House again in 2024 — but the vast majority of Americans do not.

A national survey of adults released Thursday by Marquette Law School found that by a 60 percent to 40 percent margin, those who identify as Republicans would like Trump to run in the next presidential election. But overall, just 28 percent of those surveyed want to see another Trump campaign, versus 71 percent who do not.

The poll results show 73 percent of independents and 94 percent of Democrats oppose Trump running again.

While 73 percent of Republicans say they have a favorable view of the one-term president, just 32 percent do overall — and 65 percent of Americans hold an unfavorable opinion of him.

This puts him well below President Joe Biden, whose rating in the poll is at 45 percent favorable, 49 perecent unfavorable, and six percent unable to give a rating. The survey puts Biden's overall job approval rating at 49 percent.

This survey comes as Trump is hinting he will mount another presidential campaign. On November 8, he told Fox News, "I am certainly thinking about it and we'll see. I think a lot of people will be very happy, frankly, with the decision, and probably will announce that after the midterms."

He boasted that "a lot of great people who are thinking about running are waiting for that decision, because they're not going to run if I run."

After winning in the Electoral College in 2016 despite getting three million fewer votes than Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, Trump badly lost both the popular and the electoral votes in 2020.

Biden won 306 of the 538 electors, a margin Trump himself deemed a "landslide" four years earlier when it went in his favor, and received over seven million votes more than the incumbent.

Days after plotting to overturn the election results and egging on supporters who then rioted at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, Trump left office on January 20 with a historically low approval rating of 29 percent.

He has spent much of the time since then falsely claiming the election was stolen from him and threatening retribution against his political enemies — a strategy that does not appear to have improved his national popularity.

After Republican Virginia gubernatorial nominee Glenn Youngkin narrowly won earlier this month, Trump claimed credit for the result. "I would like to thank my BASE for coming out in force and voting for Glenn Youngkin," he wrote. "Without you, he would not have been close to winning. The MAGA movement is bigger and stronger than ever before." Trump had endorsed Youngkin, but the two had not campaigned together.

Trump faces a number of legal issues between now and the next election. His company is under criminal indictment on tax fraud charges in New York; a select House committee is investigating the Capitol insurrection and his administration's possible involvement; and Congress is still working through the federal courts to obtain his tax returns.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Trump And Melania Were Vaccinated At White House But Kept It Secret

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Before leaving the White House as president, Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump chose to be inoculated from the deadly coronavirus, but opted to keep it a secret. Republicans represent the largest group of Americans who say they will not or are unsure if they will get vaccinated.

As head of a very loyal group of supporters, Trump could have gone on national television, as President-elect Joe Biden did, to receive the vaccine, which would have helped convert many opposed to the life-saving shot.

On Monday, the New York Times' Maggie Haberman reported the news that Trump was vaccinated, citing an advisor to the former president.

Some may have noticed that during his Sunday speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), Trump in a rare move gave lip service to getting the vaccine, although couching it in an attack against President Biden. He told supporters to "go get your shot."

"Remember, we took care of a lot of people, including, I guess on December 21st, we took care of Joe Biden, because he got his shot," Trump told the CPAC crowd in Orlando at his speech that was widely panned. "He got his vaccine. He forgot. It shows you how unpainful that vaccine shot is. So everybody go get your shot. He forgot. So it wasn't very traumatic, obviously. But he got his shot. And it's good that he got his shot."

Axios reported last week that 41 percent of Republicans say they will not get the coronavirus vaccine. That number jumps to 56 percent when including Republicans who say they are unsure. Just one-third of Republicans (33 percent) say they will get vaccinated. Compare that with 70 percent of Democrats who say they will get vaccinated.

"White Americans are now less likely than Black and Latino Americans to say they plan to get the vaccine," Axios notes.

New Poll Shows Republicans Who Fear Virus Are Flocking To Biden

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump's reelection strategy continues to be a rally-the-base approach, and millions of diehard MAGA voters have not been swayed by the coronavirus pandemic. But journalist Philip Bump, in the Washington Post, notes that support for Trump is not universal among Republican voters — and that according to a new Post/ABC News poll, one in six registered Republicans who are worried about being infected with coronavirus plan to vote for former Vice President Joe Biden.

"About half of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents say they're worried that they or their families might contract the coronavirus — and a fifth of that group say they plan to vote for Biden," Bump explains. "Looking only at registered Republican voters, the figure is 1 in 6."

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