Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Tag:

Pat Buchanan, White Supremacist, To Co-Star On PBS’s Relaunched McLaughlin Group

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters.

Pat Buchanan is a white supremacist who has complained that the United States is “committing suicide” because “Asian, African, and Latin American children” are replacing whites; said that undocumented immigrants are conducting a “third world invasion” of the country; defended Adolf Hitler as “an individual of great courage” who didn’t want to go to war; and argued that homosexuality should be “contained, segregated, controlled, and stigmatized.”

Maryland Public Television (MPT) will feature him in a public affairs program starting next month.

The public television station announced on August 12 that it will relaunch The McLaughlin Group in the Maryland and Washington, D.C., area in September. MPT also plans to expand the program nationally in January 2020 “through an agreement with American Public Television.” The program was briefly relaunched last year on WJLA, Sinclair Broadcasting Group’s D.C. station. The weekly program will feature host Tom Rogan and panelists Buchanan, Eleanor Clift, and Clarence Page, as well as guest panelists. Clift, Page, and Buchanan were panelists on the original McLaughlin Group, which was hosted by the late John McLaughlin.

Buchanan is a former aide to President Richard Nixon and a longtime media personality who worked for MSNBC and CNN. He also ran for president as a Republican and third party candidate.

In 2000, he won the Reform Party’s nomination. At the time, Donald Trump said of Buchanan: “He’s a Hitler lover. I guess he’s an anti-Semite. He doesn’t like the blacks. He doesn’t like the gays. It’s just incredible that anybody could embrace this guy.” In 2016, Buchanan said that “Trump has raised the very issues I raised in the early nineties.” Trump has flip-flopped on Buchanan, praising him for being “way ahead of your time!” and quoting him on immigration.

Media Matters asked MPT about Buchanan’s history of white supremacist and anti-LGBTQ comments. A spokesperson for the station responded with the following statement: “Public media provides a big tent for the expression of many points of view. The McLaughlin Group has been a long-time staple on public TV. It’s a program series viewers appreciate for its wide range of views and perspectives, as well as the lively debate on issues that takes place among its panelists.”

Buchanan is a white supremacist who has pushed virulently racist rhetoric.

  • Buchanan said that the United States is “committing suicide” by “not reproducing itself” while “Asian, African, and Latin American children come to inherit the estate.”

  • Buchanan has repeatedly referred to undocumented immigrants as invaders. His 2006 book is titled State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America. He said on Fox News: “You’ve got a wholesale invasion, the greatest invasion in human history, coming across your southern border, changing the composition and character of your country.”

  • Buchanan declined to disavow the idea that people of color have inferior genes compared to white people when pressed by a radio host. And as a Nixon aide, The Boston Globe reported, Buchanan “suggested in a memo to President Nixon that efforts to integrate the U.S. might only result in ‘perpetual friction’ because blacks and the poor may be genetically inferior to middle-class whites.”

  • Buchanan has repeatedly defended Adolf Hitler, including claiming that he was “an individual of great courage” and that he didn’t want war. He also complained that the Supreme Court had too many Jewish justices after Eleana Kagan was nominated to the court.

  • Buchanan defended Bob Jones University’s ban on interracial dating (the prohibition was removed in 2000).

  • Buchanan was asked if he had a problem with California becoming “majority Hispanic, majority Latino.”  He replied: “Yes, I do. Yes, I do. If their — because of the Mexican situation, Mexico has a claim on this country.” He also complained that immigration would turn the country into “a polyglot boarding house for the world, a tangle of minosquabbling rities.” He additionally warned against the country becoming “multiracial, multicultural, multiethnic,” explaining: “I prefer the kind — I grew up in a different country.”

  • Buchanan said that “in a way, both sides were right” during the Civil War.

  • Buchanan falsely claimed that “this has been a country built, basically, by white folks” and that only “white males” died at the battles at Gettysburg and Normandy.

  • Buchanan said that “America has been the best country on earth for black folks. It was here that 600,000 black people, brought from Africa in slave ships, grew into a community of 40 million, were introduced to Christian salvation, and reached the greatest levels of freedom and prosperity blacks have ever known. … We hear the grievances. Where is the gratitude?”

Buchanan also hates LGBTQ people. He has claimed that gay people are “sodomites” and said they are “literally hell-bent on satanism and suicide.” He falsely claimed that homosexuality is a “disorder” that can be handled with therapy (attempting to change someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity — also known as conversion therapy — is a discredited and harmful practice). And he said that in “a healthy society, [homosexuality] will be contained, segregated, controlled, and stigmatized.”

More on Pat Buchanan’s history, and what Maryland Public Television is bringing to television sets across the country, can be found here.

Update (8/15/19)McLaughlin Group host and conservative writer Tom Rogan responded to this post by tweeting: “Media Matters being insane as usual.”

Justice Department Blocked Report On White Supremacist Terrorism

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

The Trump administration has known since at least April that alleged white supremacists were responsible for every single act of race-based domestic terrorism in the U.S. in 2018, yet not only took no action to combat the growing right-wing violent extremism, but actually substantially reduced or even eliminated funding and programs that combat white supremacist extremism, violence, and terrorism – and then blocked the data from reaching the hands of Congress.

“Domestic Terrorism in 2018,” a document (embedded below) prepared by the State of New Jersey’s Office of Homeland Security Preparedness, “shows 25 of the 46 individuals allegedly involved in 32 different domestic terrorism incidents were identified as white supremacists,” Yahoo News’ Jana Winter and Hunter Walker report.

That document finds there were “32 domestic terrorist attacks, disrupted plots, threats of violence, and weapons stockpiling by individuals with a radical political or social agenda who lack direction or influence from foreign terrorist organizations in 2018.”

The report was “circulated” throughout the U.S. Dept. of Justice “and around the country in April just as members of the Senate pushed the DOJ to provide them with precise information about the number of white supremacists involved in domestic terrorism.”

The Justice Department, under President Trump’s hand-picked Attorney General Bill Barr, refused to hand over the data or the document to Congress.

Meanwhile, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) in January of 2019 had already compiled a report, announcing that, “Right-Wing Extremism Linked to Every 2018 Extremist Murder in the U.S., ADL Finds.”

ADL reported that “Right-wing extremists were linked to at least 50 extremist-related murders in the United States in 2018, making them responsible for more deaths than in any year since 1995, according to new data from the ADL.”

1995 was the year domestic terrorist Timothy McVeigh blew up the Oklahoma City federal building, slaughtering 168 people and injuring more than 680 others.

“The tally represents a 35 percent increase from the 37 extremist-related murders in 2017,” ADL reported, “making 2018 the fourth-deadliest year on record for domestic extremist-related killings since 1970. Last year saw the highest percentage of right-wing extremist-related killings since 2012, the last year when all documented killings were by right-wing extremists.”

Why the Dept. of Justice and the White House blocked the data from reaching Congress is now yet another investigation Congress should take up.

Here’s the document the DOJ refused to hand over to Members of the House and Senate:

Domestic Terrorism in 2018.pdf by Kelli R. Grant on Scribd

Conway: Trump Didn’t Inspire New Zealand Mass Murderer

Although President Donald Trump posted a tweet last Friday condemning the anti-Islam terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand (which has resulted in 50 deaths so far), some of his critics have noted that one of the suspects published a 74-page manifesto that described Trump as “a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose.” But Trump advisor Kellyanne Conway, during a Monday morning appearance on Fox News’ Fox and Friends, vehemently denied that Trump was an inspiration for the shooter in any way.

While Conway was addressing Fox and Friends co-host Steve Doocy and others, a headline ran across the bottom of the screen saying, “Media, Dems, blame Trump in wake of NZ attacks.” And Conway told the Fox News panel, “This president condemns hate and evil and bigotry, and we will continue to do so. People should feel safe in their places of worship, and we’ve seen far too often where that is not the case.”

Conway went out of her way to distance the New Zealand shooter from Trump’s beliefs, asserting that according to the manifesto, the shooter is “not a conservative” and “referred to himself as an eco-naturalist or an eco-fascist.”

During her March 18 Fox and Friends appearance, Conway also claimed that when Rep. Steve Scalise was shot by gunman James T. Hodgkinson in Arlington, Virginia in June 2017, Republicans didn’t blame liberals for the attack. Conway claimed, “We didn’t go around saying, ‘Gee, the guy said he watches MSNBC’ or ‘He’s a Bernie supporter.’ Nobody should do that.”

But in fact, Conway herself blamed liberals in June 2017 for Hodgkinson’s shooting spree, telling “Fox and Friends” that “as Steve Scalise was fighting for his life and crawling into right field in a trail of blood, you should go back and see what people were saying about the president and the Republicans at that very moment…. If I were shot and killed tomorrow, half of Twitter would explode in applause and excitement…. You can’t attack people personally, in a way, and think that tragedies like this won’t happen.”

Conway’s vigorous defense of Trump on Monday morning came around the time her husband, conservative attorney George Conway, was criticizing Trump for all the ranting he did on Twitter over the weekend. The attorney, describing Trump as a narcissist, tweeted, “Don’t assume that the things he says and does are part of a rational plan or strategy, because they seldom are. Consider them as a product of his pathologies.”

The Conways have had many disagreements on the merits of Trump’s presidency. While George Conway has been a frequent critic of the president on the right, his wife is among Trump’s most vocal defenders.

Trump Echoes ‘Invasion’ Rhetoric Of New Zealand Terrorist Killer

Just hours after a white supremacist terrorist killed at least 49 people in two New Zealand mosques, Trump used the same language as the killer to demonize immigrants.

“People hate the word ‘invasion,’ but that’s what it is,” Trump said Friday, referring to migrants crossing the southern U.S. border. “It’s an invasion of drugs, and criminals, and people.”

Describing nonwhite immigration as an “invasion” is exactly what the New Zealand terrorist did in a racist manifesto he wrote before committing the mass murder. He “wrote that a trip to France in 2017 convinced him that the country was under ‘invasion’ by ‘nonwhites,'” the Washington Post reported.

It’s also very common for white supremacists to argue that immigrants or other groups are “invading” white countries or trying to “replace” whites.

Trump made the remarks as he signed a veto of legislation passed by Congress that would repeal his fake declaration of a “national emergency” at the border.

The emergency declaration itself is also racist, since Trump is trying to use it to fund an unnecessary border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. He consistently uses racist rhetoric to demonize the immigrants he says need to be kept out of the U.S., in order to justify building his wall.

Trump didn’t just echo white supremacist rhetoric during the veto signing; he also denied that white nationalism is a growing threat, suggesting that it’s just a small group of people. In reality, however, white nationalism and white supremacy are on the rise and are a bigger threat than other extremist ideologies.

Trump has also been specifically criticized for his anti-Muslim rhetoric, which — amplified by his fellow Republicans — has fueled increased hostility against Muslims in the United States and worldwide.

Yet even as New Zealand doctors are still working on victims of a massive terrorist attack against Muslims, Trump could not contain or constrain himself.

Bigotry defines who Trump is at his core.

Published with permission of The American Independent.