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Well, this was surely awkward. Tea Party Freshman Rep. Curt Clawson (R-Flori-duh) is the latest cringe-worthy inductee into the Sunshine State’s face-palm Hall of Fame after he repeatedly mistook two high ranking U.S. government officials for representatives of the government of India at a congressional hearing. Clawson, who earlier this year replaced disgraced Republican Rep. Trey Radel after he was busted trying to buy cocaine in Washington, even told these high-level officials of the U.S. government about his favorite Bollywood films.

To their credit, these senior employees of the U.S. government handled the situation flawlessly.

We’re sure Rep. Clawson would prefer that people didn’t see this video, but we hope you’ll share it far and wide!

Video courtesy of Foreign Policy.

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Photo by Village Square/ CC BY-NC 2.0

Reprinted with permission from The American Prospect

The barriers to amending the Constitution are so high that I've long thought it pointless to pursue any reform that way. But after four years of Donald Trump, I've changed my mind. In fact, I'm suffering from a bout of what Kathleen Sullivan in 1995 in these pages called "constitutional amendmentitis."

Sullivan—later dean of Stanford Law School—used the term for conservatives' feverish advocacy of amendments in the mid-1990s. The amendments would have, among other things, imposed a balanced federal budget, limited congressional terms, authorized laws banning flag-burning, given the president a line-item veto, and outlawed abortion. It was a good thing those amendments didn't receive the necessary two-thirds approval in both houses of Congress, much less ratification by three-fourths of the states.

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