Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Pennsylvania teacher Jane Scilovati

Screenshot from AFTHQ/ YouTube

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

In 2016, Pennsylvania special education teacher Jane Scilovati voted for Donald Trump, because "I thought he was going to shake up the system." In 2020, she's so committed to not voting for Trump that she appears in an American Federation of Teachers ad against Trump.


The AFT is putting six figures into a digital ad campaign featuring the ad. "Pennsylvania voters know that Trump has failed to work for their families because his Administration has prioritized politics and enriching himself and his cronies over responding to a global pandemic," AFT President Randi Weingarten said in a statement. "Make no mistake," she added, "there are more teachers like Jane who recognize how dangerous a second Trump presidency would pose for both education and for our kids' future."


AFT Jane Classroom Morals www.youtube.com

Narrator: Across Pennsylvania, teachers work hard to help their students become young adults we're proud of.
Jane: It's important for our leaders to be forces of good because they're supposed to be serving as role models for our children.
Narrator: Parents and teachers like Jane took a chance on Donald Trump.
Jane: In 2016, I voted for Donald Trump.
I thought he was going to shake up the system.
Narrator: But President Trump has made the job of teaching so much harder.
Jane: We have values at school that we teach: respect, responsibility. Unfortunately, when it comes to the president, we have to use him as an example of not how to behave.
And that's sad.
It's not even about the political issues.
It's about leading by example and it's about character.
President Trump is a terrible influence on American students.
Narrator: Have we stopped caring about the character and values of our children? If we reelect Donald Trump, we're telling our kids anything goes…
Jane: I can't even think about what this country is going to be like if he wins again.
Photo by Mediamodifier from Pixabay

Reprinted with permission from TomDispatch

When it rains, pieces of glass, pottery, and metal rise through the mud in the hills surrounding my Maryland home. The other day, I walked outside barefoot to fetch one of my kid's shoes and a pottery shard stabbed me in the heel. Nursing a minor infection, I wondered how long that fragment dated back.

A neighbor of mine found what he said looked like a cartridge case from an old percussion-cap rifle in his pumpkin patch. He told us that the battle of Monocacy had been fought on these grounds in July 1864, with 1,300 Union and 900 Confederate troops killed or wounded here. The stuff that surfaces in my fields when it storms may or may not be battle artifacts, but it does remind me that the past lingers and that modern America was formed in a civil war.

Keep reading... Show less