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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.com

 

As Star Wars: The Last Jedi takes over the box office this weekend, Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz unwisely decided to mess with the film’s star over net neutrality.

And he got the business end of Luke Skywalker’s lightsaber-sharp wit for his troubles.

On Saturday, Last Jedi star Mark Hamill tweeted a clever, Star Wars-themed rebuke of the Trump FCC’s gutting of net neutrality:

Given a full day to formulate a response, Cruz replied to Hamill on Sunday with a desperate attempt at spinning the undemocratic move as a blow for freedom:

Hamill was having none of it, and responded by cutting Cruz down like a first-year Sith Lord, throwing in a reference to Cruz’s apparent porn habit for good measure:

In September, Cruz was scandalized when someone on his Twitter account “liked” a porn video. Ironically, the demise of net neutrality could result in greater difficulty accessing whatever sort of content Cruz and his staff enjoy, a practical example of the decision’s consequences.

Just as Luke Skywalker serves as a symbolic rallying point for the fictional Resistance, Mark Hamill speaks for many people in the real resistance, who want a free and open internet.

The Force of public opinion is with us, not Ted Cruz.

 

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