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Ted Nugent vowed that he would be in dead or jail by now if President Obama was re-elected. Instead, he will be campaigning with the likely Republican nominee to replace Rick Perry as governor of Texas, Greg Abbott.

The musician’s history of dodging the draft and allegedly having sexual relations with an underaged Courtney Love do not seem to bother the Republicans — including former Republican nominee for president Mitt Romney — who continually seek out his support. Neither does his constant misogynistic and racially provocative rhetoric.

In fact, it inspires them to “work close” with “the Nuge,” as he explained last year:

I’m contacted all the time, I work close with Ted Cruz who is a great patriot, a great statesman. I worked close with Scott Walker’s team in Wisconsin when he took it away from the hippies and got rid of the [unintelligible] and got some freedom back in Wisconsin. I’ve worked with Governor Engler in the past. I’ve worked with different sheriffs and different attorney generals. I work closely with Greg Abbott and Governor Perry in Texas.

All of this leads me to wonder, what could Ted Nugent possibly say that would lead to Republicans not embracing him publicly… besides something decent about President Obama?

nugent

 

Photo: chascar via Flickr

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