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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Jim Slater

Louisville (AFP) — Japan’s Hideki Matsuyama grabbed a share of the early lead while Tiger Woods struggled at the start Thursday as the 96th PGA Championship began at Valhalla.

Woods, a 14-time major champion chasing the all-time record 18 majors won by Jack Nicklaus, had been doubtful for the year’s final top event with a back injury until playing a nine-hole practice round Wednesday and declaring himself fit for the 72-hole showdown.

Purple-shirted Woods, making his 72nd major start alongside Phil Mickelson and Padraig Harrington, took bogeys at the par-3 11th and 14th, each time missing the green off the tee and failing to convert a 13-foot par putt. In between, he also missed a seven-foot birdie bid at 13.

But Woods answered at the 16th by holing out for birdie on a 34-yard shot from the fairway, pulling back to one-over, putting him four strokes off the pace being set by Matsuyama, Sweden’s Freddie Jacobson, Finland’s Mikko Ilonen, and American Brendon Todd.

AFP Photo/Sam Greenwood

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Danziger Draws

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Attorney General Merrick Garland

Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

The Department of Justice had the kind of pro-police reform week that doesn't happen every year. In a seven-day period, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced a ban on chokeholds and no-knock warrants, an overhaul on how to handle law enforcement oversight deals, and a promise to make sure the Justice Department wasn't funding agencies that engage in racial discrimination.

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