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Photo by Michael Vadon is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Donald Trump said again that the coronavirus will simply "disappear," even as cases climb at a record pace, thanks in part to states that reopened against public health guidance.

"I do. I do. Yeah sure. At some point. And I think we're going to have a vaccine very soon too," Trump said in a Wednesday interview with Fox Business Network's Blake Burman, who asked Trump whether he still thought the virus would disappear.


Trump added, "We're headed back in a very strong fashion. ... And I think we're going to be very good with the coronavirus. I think that at some point that's going to sort of just disappear. I hope."

Trump's comments mirror those he made in April, which some thought would be the peak of the virus in the United States.

However, since then, states began to reopen their economies without following basic guidance from public health experts, such as implementing face mask requirements and social distancing measures.

Now, cases of the virus are climbing at a record pace, with the United States setting a record on Wednesday for the highest single-day rise in positive tests. A whopping 49,932 positive tests came back positive in the United States on Wednesday, according to the New York Times.

Some states are now scaling back their reopening plans as a result.

The massive rise in cases comes before the July 4 holiday weekend, when Americans usually gather for celebrations.

Trump is traveling to Mount Rushmore for a fireworks display, in which revelers will not have to practice social distancing measures. He also ignored pleas from local officials in the Washington, D.C., area to cancel July 4 celebrations in the District of Columbia.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert on Trump's coronavirus task force, told journalist Jessica Yellin that he would advise Americans not to go to Trump's fireworks display at Mount Rushmore.

"You should avoid whenever possible gathering in crowds where people cannot maintain physical distance," Fauci said.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

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