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When Donald Trump isn’t suing HBO host Bill Maher for claiming he is the offspring of a human and orangutan, he is busy attacking fellow Republicans like Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal.

The billionaire real estate mogul, failed presidential contender and Obama birth certificate conspiracy fanatic said on Fox & Friends that Jindal was “stupid” for calling Republicans “the stupid party” at the Republican National Committee’s winter meeting last month.

“I think he was stupid for using that term because that term is so obnoxious and so good for the other side,” said Trump, who went on to say that while he speaks ill of Republican negotiating abilities, he would never use the term “stupid” to describe the GOP.  “You don’t use the word stupid…frankly I think it was a stupid thing for him to say.”

Except “stupid” is exactly what Trump called Republicans in a 2011 video message, saying “the Democrats are laughing at the stupidity of the Republicans and the Paul Ryan plan.” Later in the video, Trump said “ultimately I don’t want to battle against the Republicans’ stupidity, because it’s stupidity the things they are doing.”

Here is Trump calling Jindal stupid for calling Republicans stupid:

And here is Trump calling Republicans stupid:

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