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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

It’s now on between Donald Trump and his latest mainstream Republican challenger.

Senator Marco Rubio appeared on Fox News Tuesday night with Sean Hannity — a host who has deftly played both sides of the Trump vs. Establishment GOP divide — and watched a highlight reel of Trump’s various insults against Rubio (including substantive jibes like a crack from The Donald about Rubio sweating a lot).

The exchange begins at the 7:00 mark below:

“Look, it’s very clear he’s a very insecure person, he doesn’t like to be criticized,” Rubio said. “You know, the presidency is a tough job. You’re gonna be criticized, and you can’t flip out every time somebody says something about you. He does. And that’s his problem. I don’t have time to kind of analyze why that is, but that’s the reality of it.

“He had a bad week — you know, he got booed on a stage. He had very few people show up to an event he gave. Just today, Tom Brady said he’s not endorsing Donald Trump, despite these reports — he doesn’t even have Tom Brady on his side now. So he’s a very sensitive guy. And that’s fine, that’s his problem. I’m not gonna worry about it.”

Trump responded on Wednesday morning, slamming Rubio on immigration — and also calling him “lazy.” (Hmm, dogwhistle much?)

The Donald followed that up with another tweet, featuring something we don’t often see from Republican candidates: recommending that people read an article in The New York Times — regarding Rubio’s personal finances and dependence on a wealthy backer.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

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