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President Joe Biden

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

In a new interview with CBS News, President Joe Biden said that he doesn't think former President Donald Trump should get briefings on intelligence matters anymore now that he's out of office.

As a courtesy, former presidents are typically permitted to continue receiving such briefings. But the decision is left up to the sitting president.Biden suggested that because of Trump's "erratic behavior," it would not be appropriate for him to continue getting briefed. This consideration, he said, was apart from concerns about Trump's role in the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

One reason former presidents are often given briefings is that the current president may choose to consult them on decisions that could impact national security. But Biden's comments indicate, unsurprisingly, that he doesn't foresee that happening.

In fact, he suggested there would be a risk Trump would reveal information that should be kept secret.

"What value is giving him an intelligence briefing? What impact does he have at all, other than he might slip and say something?" he said.



Sue Gordon, who served as a leader in the intelligence community under Trump before she resigned, recently wrote an op-ed arguing the former president shouldn't receive these briefings anymore.

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