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Trump angrily stormed out of a meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Wednesday after demanding that Congress stop investigating his administration’s crimes.

“Trump walked in to meeting with Dems on infrastructure, did not shake anyone’s hand or sit in his seat,” HuffPost reporter Igor Bobic tweeted Wednesday, citing a source familiar with what happened.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Trump will refuse to continue his promised negotiations with Democrats in Congress on infrastructure and drug prices until Congress finishes its investigations into him.

“[Trump] objected to the continued investigation of obstruction of justice, he said he cooperated and gave his side of the story, as we’ve heard before, said Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), who was present for the unprecedented meltdown.

Trump was upset at Pelosi for saying earlier in the day that said Trump was engaging in a “cover up.”

The private angry display was followed up by a bizarre public event in the Rose Garden of the White House.

“I walked into the room and I told Senator Schumer, Speaker Pelosi, I want to do infrastructure … but you know what? You can’t do it under these circumstances, So get these phony investigations over with,” Trump said.

The White House press office, led by press secretary Sarah Sanders, handed out childish leaflets to the press with “statistics” that purported to show why the investigations should be dropped.

During the event, Trump also berated members of the press for accurately reporting on the Mueller Report’s findings that he obstructed justice, and on the ongoing congressional investigations into the findings.

“This whole thing was a takedown attempt at the president of the United States, and honestly you ought to be ashamed of yourselves for the way you’ve reported so dishonestly,” Trump told the assembled reporters, apparently referring to special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Trump now refuses to do the job he swore an oath to do because Congress is doing its basic constitutional oversight duties to investigate his many alleged crimes and abuses of power.

Published with permission of The American Independent. 

IMAGE: President Trump speaking in White House Rose Garden on Wednesday.

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