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Off the air during the week since Trump’s inauguration, Stephen Colbert returned to a dizzying situation, as a flood of executive orders — each more disturbing than the last — flew from the new president’s desk. “You get right back on the roller coaster,” cracked the Late Show host, “and start throwing up.”

But despite the brief hiatus, Colbert hasn’t lost a step. How would Kellyanne Conway describe the treatment of that frightened five year-old Iranian child separated from his mother at Dulles Airport due to Trump’s immigration ban? That was just “alternative day care!”

Naturally, he was impressed by the tens of thousands of angry Americans who descended on airports all over country in protest of that order. “Do you have any idea how angry people have to be to voluntarily go to JFK?” Still, we know that the immigration order and its implementation was “a massive success story on every single level” because a White House source said so — anonymously, which is how everyone boasts about a massive success story.

And then, there’s Steve Bannon, the Rasputin-like presidential adviser responsible for the immigration order, who has inserted himself onto the National Security Council. Bannon seems to have badly irritated Colbert…

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